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FA info icon.svgAngle down icon.svgSource data
Type Paper
Cite as Citation reference for the source document. Ismo T. S. Heikkinen, Christoffer Kauppinen, Zhengjun Liu, Sanja M. Asikainen, Steven Spoljaric, Jukka V. Seppälä, Hele Savin, and Joshua M. Pearce. Chemical Compatibility of Fused Filament Fabrication -based 3-D Printed Components with Solutions Commonly Used in Semiconductor Wet Processing. Additive Manufacturing 23, pp. 99-107 (2018). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2018.07.015 open access

3-D printing shows great potential in laboratories for making customized labware and reaction vessels. In addition, affordable fused filament fabrication (FFF)-based 3-D printing has successfully produced high-quality and affordable scientific equipment, focusing on tools without strict chemical compatibility limitations. As the additives and colorants used in 3-D printing filaments are proprietary, their compatibility with common chemicals is unknown, which has prevented their widespread use in laboratory chemical processing. In this study, the compatibility of ten widely available FFF plastics with solvents, acids, bases and solutions used in the wet processing of semiconductor materials is explored. The results provide data on materials unavailable in the literature and the chemical properties of 3-D printable plastics that were, are in line with literature. Overall, many 3-D printable plastics are compatible with concentrated solutions. Polypropylene emerged as a promising 3-D printable material for semiconductor processing due to its tolerance of strongly oxidizing acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids. In addition, 3-D printed custom tools were demonstrated for a range of wet processing applications. The results show that 3-D printed plastics are potential materials for bespoke chemically resistant labware at less than 10% of the cost of such purchased tools. However, further studies are required to ascertain if such materials are fully compatible with clean room processing.

  • Source files- Included SCAD and STL files for the designs tested are in the attached zip folder.

The SCAD file for the dippers is in the zip. That dipper is a remix of Toffe’s original, https://3dprint.nih.gov/discover/3dpx-008194. The original jig handle by Z. Liu is here https://3dprint.nih.gov/discover/3DPX-008165 The tweezers were found on Thingiverse, Desktop_Makes: Tweezers. 3-D model, available: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1783167. Accessed March 7, 2018.

Keywords[edit | edit source]

3-D printing,chemical compatibility, semiconductor wet processing, custom labware, clean rooms

Key Findings[edit | edit source]

Chem3dpfindings.jpg

See also[edit | edit source]

In the News[edit | edit source]

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  • Research finds 3D printed chemically resistant labware viable with low-cost printers 3D Printing Industry 78.3k, 3D Print Home, 3D Print.In
  • Analysis finds 3D printed chemically resistant labware viable with low-cost printers Junkies Tech
  • Experiment Tests the Suitability of 3D Printing Materials for Creating Lab Equipment 3DPrint
  • 3D-printed tools welcome Cleanroom Technology
  • Research finds 3D printed chemically resistant labware viable with low-cost printers Microfabricator
FA info icon.svgAngle down icon.svgPage data
Authors Joshua M. Pearce
License CC-BY-SA-3.0
Language English (en)
Related subpages, pages link here
Impact 453 page views
Created July 30, 2018 by Joshua M. Pearce
Modified July 14, 2023 by Felipe Schenone
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