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Type Paper
Cite as Citation reference for the source document. Lucas S. Osborn, Joshua Pearce, Amberlee Haselhuhn. A Case for Weakening Patent Rights. St. John’s Law Review. 89(4), pp.1185-1253 (2015). Open access preprint

This Article provocatively asserts that lawmakers should weaken patents significantly—by between 25% and 50%. The primary impetus for this conclusion is the under-appreciated effects of new and emerging technologies, including three-dimensional printing, synthetic biology, and cloud computing. These and other technologies are rapidly decreasing the costs of each stage of the innovation cycle: from basic research, through inventing and prototyping, to marketing and distribution. The primary economic theories supporting patent law hold that inventors and innovators need patents to recoup the costs associated with research, inventing, and commercializing. Because new technologies have begun—and will continue—to dramatically decrease these costs, the case for weakening patents is ripe for analysis.

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FA info icon.svgAngle down icon.svgPage data
Authors Joshua M. Pearce
License CC-BY-SA-3.0
Language English (en)
Related 0 subpages, 6 pages link here
Aliases The Case for Weaker Patents
Impact 495 page views
Created March 27, 2015 by Joshua M. Pearce
Modified November 6, 2023 by StandardWikitext bot
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