The aim of this page is to recognise, celebrate and encourage the self-empowerment of community agency networks (CANs) and community groups across New Mexico.

SandiaMountainsByLuigiNovi79.jpg
Font Awesome map marker.svg Angle down icon.svg Location data
Loading map...
Location New Mexico, United States
  • News Millions of Californians live near oil and gas wells that are in the path of wildfires, latimes.com (Jul 21, 2024)
  • News I saw first-hand just how much fracking destroys the earth, Rebecca Solnit, theguardian.com (Jun 30, 2024)

Read more

Networks and sustainability initiatives[edit | edit source]

Climate action[edit | edit source]

New Mexico is a major producer of greenhouse gases. A study by Colorado State University showed that the state's oil and gas industry generated 60 million metric tons of greenhouse gases in 2018, over four times greater than previously estimated. The fossil fuels sector accounted for over half the state's overall emissions, which totaled 113.6 million metric tons, about 1.8% of the country's total and more than twice the national average per capita. The New Mexico government has responded with efforts to regulate industrial emissions, promote renewable energy, and incentivize the use of electric vehicles. W

Governmental response[edit | edit source]

Wikipedia W icon.svg

Climate change in New Mexico encompasses the effects of climate change, attributed to man-made increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide, in the U.S. state of New Mexico.

According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, "New Mexico's climate is changing. Most of the state has warmed at least one degree (F) in the last century. Throughout the southwestern United States, heat waves are becoming more common, and snow is melting earlier in spring. In the coming decades, our changing climate is likely to decrease the flow of water in the Colorado, Rio Grande, and other rivers; threaten the health of livestock; increase the frequency and intensity of wildfires; and convert some rangelands to desert". Climate change is adversely affecting New Mexico by increasing temperatures and making the region drier.

"As the climate warms, less precipitation falls as snow, and more snow melts during the winter. That decreases snowpack—the amount of snow that accumulates over the winter. Since the 1950s, the snowpack has been decreasing in New Mexico, as well as in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, which matters because the headwaters of the Rio Grande, San Juan, Colorado, and Navajo rivers are in those states.

Diminishing snowpack in northern New Mexico will shorten the season for skiing and other forms of winter tourism and recreation. The tree line may shift, as subalpine fir and other high-altitude trees become able to grow at higher elevations. A higher tree line would decrease the extent of alpine tundra ecosystems, which could threaten some species".

"The changing climate is likely to increase the need for water but reduce the supply. Warmer temperatures increase the rate at which water evaporates (or transpires) into the air from soils, plants, and surface waters. Irrigated farmland would thus need more water. But less water is likely to be available, because precipitation is unlikely to increase enough to make up for the additional water lost to evaporation. Annual rainfall is more likely to decrease than increase. So soils are likely to be drier, and periods without rain are likely to become longer, making droughts more severe. The decline in snowpack could further limit the supply of water for some purposes.

Mountain snowpacks are natural reservoirs. They collect the snow that falls during winter and release water when the snow melts during spring and summer. Over the past 50 years, snowpack has been melting earlier in the year. Dams capture most meltwater and retain it for use later in the year. But upstream of these reservoirs, less water is available during droughts for ecosystems, fish, water-based recreation, and landowners who draw water directly from a flowing river".

Due to the increase in climate change New Mexicos water resources have plummeted. In 2019, the Center for Biological Diversity named New Mexico's Gila River as the nation's most endangered river, due to climate change.

"Increasing droughts and higher temperatures are likely to interfere with New Mexico’s farms and cattle ranches. Hot weather can threaten cows’ health and cause them to eat less, grow more slowly, and produce less milk. Livestock operations could also be impaired by fire and changes in the landscape from grassland to woody shrubs more typical of a desert.

Reduced water availability would create challenges for ranchers, as well as farmers who irrigate fruits, vegetables, pecans, and other nut trees".

"Higher temperatures and drought are likely to increase the severity, frequency, and extent of wildfires, which could harm property, livelihoods, and human health. On average, more than 2 percent of the land in New Mexico has burned per decade since 1984. Wildfire smoke can reduce air quality and increase medical visits for chest pains, respiratory problems, and heart problems".

"The combination of more fires and drier conditions may expand deserts and otherwise change parts of New Mexico’s landscape. Many plants and animals living in arid lands are already near the limits of what they can tolerate. A warmer and a drier climate would generally extend the Chihuahuan desert to higher elevations and expand its geographic range. In some cases, native vegetation may persist and delay or prevent expansion of the desert. In other cases, fires or livestock grazing may accelerate the conversion of grassland to desert in response to the changing climate. For similar reasons, some forests may change to desert or grassland".

"Warmer, drier conditions make forests more susceptible to pests. Drought reduces the ability of trees to mount a defense against attacks from pests such as bark beetles, which have infested 200,000 acres in New Mexico. Temperature controls the life cycle and winter mortality rates of many pests. With higher winter temperatures, some pests can persist year-round, and new pests and diseases may become established".

"Hot days can be unhealthy—even dangerous. Certain people are especially vulnerable, including children, the elderly, the sick, and the poor. High air temperatures can cause heat stroke and dehydration, and affect people’s cardiovascular, respiratory, and nervous systems. Higher temperatures are amplified in urban settings where paved and other surfaces tend to store heat. Warmer air can also increase the formation of ground-level ozone, a key component of smog. Construction crews may have to increasingly operate on altered time schedules to avoid the heat of the day". New Mexico belongs to the southwest region. Which subsequently since the 1970's New Mexico's average temperature has risen up by 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit because of our lack of effort on reducing the production of greenhouse gasses. Which makes the southwest the hottest and driest region in the United States.

"Climate change threatens natural resources and public health of tribal communities. Rising temperatures and increasing drought are likely to decrease the availability of certain fish, game, and wild plants on which the Navajo and other tribes have relied for generations. Water may be less available for domestic consumption, especially for those who are not served by either municipal systems or reliable wells, which includes about 30 percent of the people on the Navajo Nation, who must haul water to meet daily needs. Recurring drought and rising temperatures may also degrade the land itself. On the Arizona portion of the Navajo Nation, for example, the Great Falls Dune Field has advanced almost a mile in the last 60 years, threatening roads, homes, and grazing areas. Extreme heat may also create health problems for those without electricity, including about 40 percent of the people on the Navajo reservation.

In January 2019, Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham signed an executive order on addressing climate change and energy waste prevention. From this order, New Mexico joined the United States Climate Alliance with a goal of lowering greenhouse gas emissions by 45% from 2005 levels by 2030. As well as supporting the objective of the Paris Agreement at state level. In addition a Climate Change Task Force was charged with producing a New Mexico Climate Strategy.

  • Plug-in electric vehicles in New Mexico
  • Gonzalez, P.; G.M. Garfin; D.D. Breshears; K.M. Brooks; H.E. Brown; E.H. Elias; A. Gunasekara; N. Huntly; J.K. Maldonado; N.J. Mantua; H.G. Margolis; S. McAfee; B.R. Middleton; B.H. Udall (2018). "Southwest". In Reidmiller, D.R.; C.W. Avery; D.R. Easterling; K.E. Kunkel; K.L.M. Lewis; T.K. Maycock; B.C. Stewart (eds.). Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States: Fourth National Climate Assessment, Volume II (Report). Washington, DC, USA: U.S. Global Change Research Program. pp. 1101–1184. doi:10.7930/NCA4.2018.CH25.—this chapter of the National Climate Assessment covers Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, and Utah
  • Hurd, Brian H.; Coonrod, Julie (August 2008). Climate Change and Its Implications for New Mexico's Water Resources and Economic Opportunities (TR-45) (Report). Retrieved May 17, 2020.
  • Union of Concerned Scientists (2016). Confronting Climate Change in New Mexico: Action needed today to prepare the state for a hotter, drier future (Report).

Climate change in New Mexico[edit | edit source]

According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, "New Mexico's climate is changing. Most of the state has warmed at least one degree (F) in the last century. Throughout the southwestern United States, heat waves are becoming more common, and snow is melting earlier in spring. In the coming decades, our changing climate is likely to decrease the flow of water in the Colorado, Rio Grande, and other rivers; threaten the health of livestock; increase the frequency and intensity of wildfires; and convert some rangelands to desert". W

Climate change and Tribal communities[edit | edit source]

Wikipedia W icon.svg

Climate change in New Mexico encompasses the effects of climate change, attributed to man-made increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide, in the U.S. state of New Mexico.

According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, "New Mexico's climate is changing. Most of the state has warmed at least one degree (F) in the last century. Throughout the southwestern United States, heat waves are becoming more common, and snow is melting earlier in spring. In the coming decades, our changing climate is likely to decrease the flow of water in the Colorado, Rio Grande, and other rivers; threaten the health of livestock; increase the frequency and intensity of wildfires; and convert some rangelands to desert". Climate change is adversely affecting New Mexico by increasing temperatures and making the region drier.

"As the climate warms, less precipitation falls as snow, and more snow melts during the winter. That decreases snowpack—the amount of snow that accumulates over the winter. Since the 1950s, the snowpack has been decreasing in New Mexico, as well as in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, which matters because the headwaters of the Rio Grande, San Juan, Colorado, and Navajo rivers are in those states.

Diminishing snowpack in northern New Mexico will shorten the season for skiing and other forms of winter tourism and recreation. The tree line may shift, as subalpine fir and other high-altitude trees become able to grow at higher elevations. A higher tree line would decrease the extent of alpine tundra ecosystems, which could threaten some species".

"The changing climate is likely to increase the need for water but reduce the supply. Warmer temperatures increase the rate at which water evaporates (or transpires) into the air from soils, plants, and surface waters. Irrigated farmland would thus need more water. But less water is likely to be available, because precipitation is unlikely to increase enough to make up for the additional water lost to evaporation. Annual rainfall is more likely to decrease than increase. So soils are likely to be drier, and periods without rain are likely to become longer, making droughts more severe. The decline in snowpack could further limit the supply of water for some purposes.

Mountain snowpacks are natural reservoirs. They collect the snow that falls during winter and release water when the snow melts during spring and summer. Over the past 50 years, snowpack has been melting earlier in the year. Dams capture most meltwater and retain it for use later in the year. But upstream of these reservoirs, less water is available during droughts for ecosystems, fish, water-based recreation, and landowners who draw water directly from a flowing river".

Due to the increase in climate change New Mexicos water resources have plummeted. In 2019, the Center for Biological Diversity named New Mexico's Gila River as the nation's most endangered river, due to climate change.

"Increasing droughts and higher temperatures are likely to interfere with New Mexico’s farms and cattle ranches. Hot weather can threaten cows’ health and cause them to eat less, grow more slowly, and produce less milk. Livestock operations could also be impaired by fire and changes in the landscape from grassland to woody shrubs more typical of a desert.

Reduced water availability would create challenges for ranchers, as well as farmers who irrigate fruits, vegetables, pecans, and other nut trees".

"Higher temperatures and drought are likely to increase the severity, frequency, and extent of wildfires, which could harm property, livelihoods, and human health. On average, more than 2 percent of the land in New Mexico has burned per decade since 1984. Wildfire smoke can reduce air quality and increase medical visits for chest pains, respiratory problems, and heart problems".

"The combination of more fires and drier conditions may expand deserts and otherwise change parts of New Mexico’s landscape. Many plants and animals living in arid lands are already near the limits of what they can tolerate. A warmer and a drier climate would generally extend the Chihuahuan desert to higher elevations and expand its geographic range. In some cases, native vegetation may persist and delay or prevent expansion of the desert. In other cases, fires or livestock grazing may accelerate the conversion of grassland to desert in response to the changing climate. For similar reasons, some forests may change to desert or grassland".

"Warmer, drier conditions make forests more susceptible to pests. Drought reduces the ability of trees to mount a defense against attacks from pests such as bark beetles, which have infested 200,000 acres in New Mexico. Temperature controls the life cycle and winter mortality rates of many pests. With higher winter temperatures, some pests can persist year-round, and new pests and diseases may become established".

"Hot days can be unhealthy—even dangerous. Certain people are especially vulnerable, including children, the elderly, the sick, and the poor. High air temperatures can cause heat stroke and dehydration, and affect people’s cardiovascular, respiratory, and nervous systems. Higher temperatures are amplified in urban settings where paved and other surfaces tend to store heat. Warmer air can also increase the formation of ground-level ozone, a key component of smog. Construction crews may have to increasingly operate on altered time schedules to avoid the heat of the day". New Mexico belongs to the southwest region. Which subsequently since the 1970's New Mexico's average temperature has risen up by 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit because of our lack of effort on reducing the production of greenhouse gasses. Which makes the southwest the hottest and driest region in the United States.

"Climate change threatens natural resources and public health of tribal communities. Rising temperatures and increasing drought are likely to decrease the availability of certain fish, game, and wild plants on which the Navajo and other tribes have relied for generations. Water may be less available for domestic consumption, especially for those who are not served by either municipal systems or reliable wells, which includes about 30 percent of the people on the Navajo Nation, who must haul water to meet daily needs. Recurring drought and rising temperatures may also degrade the land itself. On the Arizona portion of the Navajo Nation, for example, the Great Falls Dune Field has advanced almost a mile in the last 60 years, threatening roads, homes, and grazing areas. Extreme heat may also create health problems for those without electricity, including about 40 percent of the people on the Navajo reservation.

In January 2019, Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham signed an executive order on addressing climate change and energy waste prevention. From this order, New Mexico joined the United States Climate Alliance with a goal of lowering greenhouse gas emissions by 45% from 2005 levels by 2030. As well as supporting the objective of the Paris Agreement at state level. In addition a Climate Change Task Force was charged with producing a New Mexico Climate Strategy.

  • Plug-in electric vehicles in New Mexico
  • Gonzalez, P.; G.M. Garfin; D.D. Breshears; K.M. Brooks; H.E. Brown; E.H. Elias; A. Gunasekara; N. Huntly; J.K. Maldonado; N.J. Mantua; H.G. Margolis; S. McAfee; B.R. Middleton; B.H. Udall (2018). "Southwest". In Reidmiller, D.R.; C.W. Avery; D.R. Easterling; K.E. Kunkel; K.L.M. Lewis; T.K. Maycock; B.C. Stewart (eds.). Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States: Fourth National Climate Assessment, Volume II (Report). Washington, DC, USA: U.S. Global Change Research Program. pp. 1101–1184. doi:10.7930/NCA4.2018.CH25.—this chapter of the National Climate Assessment covers Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, and Utah
  • Hurd, Brian H.; Coonrod, Julie (August 2008). Climate Change and Its Implications for New Mexico's Water Resources and Economic Opportunities (TR-45) (Report). Retrieved May 17, 2020.
  • Union of Concerned Scientists (2016). Confronting Climate Change in New Mexico: Action needed today to prepare the state for a hotter, drier future (Report).

Biodiversity[edit | edit source]

Wikipedia W icon.svg

The Rio Grande Nature Center State Park is a New Mexico State Park located adjacent to the Rio Grande in Albuquerque, New Mexico, US. The Rio Grande Nature Center is a 38-acre urban wildlife preserve established in 1982. About two thirds of the grounds of the park are set aside as habitat for wildlife. The remaining acreage contains a visitors' center, two gardens, several wildlife viewing areas, an education building and a building housing the non-profit Wildlife Rescue, Inc. There are four constructed ponds which provide habitat for birds and other wildlife and which mimic wetland features of the historical flood plain of the Rio Grande.

Community energy[edit | edit source]

Wikipedia W icon.svg

Solar power in New Mexico in 2016 generated 2.8% of the state's total electricity consumption, despite a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) projection suggesting a potential contribution three orders of magnitude larger.

Wikipedia W icon.svg

As of the end of 2021, New Mexico had 4,001 megawatts (MW) of wind powered electricity generating capacity, responsible for 30% of electricity produced that year. Wind power in New Mexico has the potential to generate more than all of the electricity consumed in the state.

Cycling activism[edit | edit source]

Bicycling, information from the City of Albuquerque - Wikipedia: List of New Mexico State Bike Routes

Education for sustainability[edit | edit source]

mqdefault.jpgYouTube_icon.svg

Ampersand Sustainable Learning Center

Social inclusion[edit | edit source]

Wikipedia W icon.svg

New Mexico (Spanish: Nuevo México [ˈnweβo ˈmexiko] ; Navajo: Yootó Hahoodzo Navajo pronunciation: [jòːtʰó hɑ̀hòːtsò]) is a state in the Southwestern region of the United States. It is one of the Mountain States of the southern Rocky Mountains, sharing the Four Corners region with Utah, Colorado, and Arizona. It also borders the state of Texas to the east and southeast, Oklahoma to the northeast, and the Mexican states of Chihuahua and Sonora to the south. New Mexico's largest city is Albuquerque, and its state capital is Santa Fe, the oldest state capital in the U.S., founded in 1610 as the government seat of Nuevo México in New Spain.

Sustainable transport activism[edit | edit source]

Wikipedia: Hiking trails in New Mexico (category)

Towards sustainable economies[edit | edit source]

The New Mexico Legislature is considering implementing a statewide guaranteed basic income program targeting poorer residents; if enacted, it would be only the second U.S. state after California with such a policy. In August 2021, Santa Fe announced a one-year pilot program that would provide a "stability stipend" of $400 monthly to 100 parents under the age of 30 who attend Santa Fe Community College; the results of the program will determine whether the state government follows suit with its own basic income proposals. Las Cruces, the state's second largest city, is officially discussing the enactment of a similar program. W

Resources[edit | edit source]

Citizens data initiative[edit | edit source]

Energy Profile for New Mexico, Economic, environmental, and energy data

Maps[edit | edit source]

Bike Map, City of Albuquerque

News and comment[edit | edit source]

2015

  • 2% Solutions for the Planet, October 19, 2015...[1]

Instead of handing out tickets, Albuquerque is offering jobs to homeless people. October 16[2]

Environmental issues[edit | edit source]

Wikipedia W icon.svg

New Mexico (Spanish: Nuevo México [ˈnweβo ˈmexiko] ; Navajo: Yootó Hahoodzo Navajo pronunciation: [jòːtʰó hɑ̀hòːtsò]) is a state in the Southwestern region of the United States. It is one of the Mountain States of the southern Rocky Mountains, sharing the Four Corners region with Utah, Colorado, and Arizona. It also borders the state of Texas to the east and southeast, Oklahoma to the northeast, and the Mexican states of Chihuahua and Sonora to the south. New Mexico's largest city is Albuquerque, and its state capital is Santa Fe, the oldest state capital in the U.S., founded in 1610 as the government seat of Nuevo México in New Spain.

About New Mexico[edit | edit source]

Wikipedia W icon.svg

New Mexico (Spanish: Nuevo México [ˈnweβo ˈmexiko] ; Navajo: Yootó Hahoodzo Navajo pronunciation: [jòːtʰó hɑ̀hòːtsò]) is a state in the Southwestern region of the United States. It is one of the Mountain States of the southern Rocky Mountains, sharing the Four Corners region with Utah, Colorado, and Arizona. It also borders the state of Texas to the east and southeast, Oklahoma to the northeast, and the Mexican states of Chihuahua and Sonora to the south. New Mexico's largest city is Albuquerque, and its state capital is Santa Fe, the oldest state capital in the U.S., founded in 1610 as the government seat of Nuevo México in New Spain.

New Mexico is the fifth-largest of the fifty states by area, but with just over 2.1 million residents, ranks 36th in population and 46th in population density. Its climate and geography are highly varied, ranging from forested mountains to sparse deserts; the northern and eastern regions exhibit a colder alpine climate, while the west and south are warmer and more arid. The Rio Grande and its fertile valley runs from north-to-south, creating a riparian climate through the center of the state that supports a bosque habitat and distinct Albuquerque Basin climate. One–third of New Mexico's land is federally owned, and the state hosts many protected wilderness areas and national monuments, including three UNESCO World Heritage Sites, the most of any U.S. state.

References

FA info icon.svg Angle down icon.svg Page data
Keywords us states
Authors Phil Green
License CC-BY-SA-3.0
Language English (en)
Related 0 subpages, 1 pages link here
Aliases New Mexico
Impact 606 page views
Created September 3, 2014 by Phil Green
Modified July 3, 2024 by Phil Green
Cookies help us deliver our services. By using our services, you agree to our use of cookies.