The Yurt at CCAT[edit | edit source]

Yurt5.gif

The yurt at CCAT, as pictured above, differs in design from both traditional and imported styles of yurts. The most notable differences are that the walls are made out of plywood board and the roof is covered in wood shingles. Also, on the inside, there is a bench built into the wall that circumscribes the entire floor.

This yurt was built to be a permanent structure and is used on campus for a gathering place. Please see CCAT’s webpage and take the virtual tour for more pictures of the yurt.

Over the years many improvements have been made to the yurt including the addition of a solar PV system to power LED lights and small AC loads and a new roof made from recycled cans that is fully equipped with Liter-of-Light bottles to provide day lighting. See the operation and maintenance instructions on how to best care for this technology at the Appropedia page CCAT yurt/OM.

Update 2013[edit | edit source]

See the new roof made from tin cans at SALIRAJA Yurt Project.

CCAT yurt. Image credit: A.R.Shearer


Update 2014[edit | edit source]

See the operation and maintenance instructions on how to best care for this technology at the Appropedia page CCAT yurt/OM developed by HSU's Spring 2014 Engineering 535 team Drew Clark, Amit Khare, and Billy Karis.

Inside of CCAT yurt as of May 2018


Update September 2019[edit | edit source]

As of Fall 2019, the Yurt House at CCAT is still up and available for students to go in and use it as a sense of relaxation.

The Yurt Roof however, needs a lot of maintenance as soon as possible. The new bottle cans that were just installed, Spring 2019, are starting to fall out. The tape that was used to seal the bottles in but allow them to take the bottles out and clean it when needed is not withstanding the wear and tare or the rain.

The skylight was sealed with a liquid sealant glue that does not look good on the inside nor is it good for the carbon footprint and sustainability. With the leaking, no mold has formed from what is has been seen but the floor is a little unstable so a new floor that is stronger is needed.

Even with the house serving its purpose for its students, a lot of renovation needs to be done to stop the leaks and keep the carbon footprint down.

Resources[edit | edit source]

Tipis and Yurts, by Blue Morning Star

Sendog6913

Web resources:

Society for Creative Anachronism pages

Commercial Yurt builders’ Websites