Attribution: bestfor / richard

Norfolk () is a county in East Anglia in England. It borders Lincolnshire to the northwest, Cambridgeshire to the west and southwest, and Suffolk to the south. Its northern and eastern boundaries are the North Sea and to the northwest, The Wash. The county town is the city of Norwich. With an area of 2,074 square miles (5,370 km2) and a population of 859,400, Norfolk is a largely rural county with a population density of 401 per square mile (155 per km2). Of the county's population, 40% live in four major built up areas: Norwich (213,000), Great Yarmouth (63,000), King's Lynn (46,000), and Thetford (25,000).

The Broads is a network of rivers and lakes in the east of the county, extending south into Suffolk. The area is not a national park although it is marketed as such. It has similar status to a national park, and is protected by the Broads Authority.

Norfolk community action[edit | edit source]

Sustainability initiatives[edit | edit source]

Local sustainability initiatives[edit source]

Please see our Local communities in Norfolk pages, where of course you can share any more information you may have about local sustainability initiatives.

Biodiversity[edit | edit source]

  • Rewilding Norfolk, whoownsnorfolk.org, added 15:36, 4 March 2021 (UTC)
  • felbecktrust, "Helping to restore and improve the Norfolk countryside for the benefit of wildlife and to provide places of peaceful enjoyment for local communities and visitors alike." (added 15:56, 17 January 2020 (UTC))

The Norfolk Wildlife Trust (NWT) is one of 46 wildlife trusts covering Great Britain, Northern Ireland, Isle of Man and Alderney. Founded in 1926, it is the oldest of all the trusts. It has over 35,500 members and eight local groups and it manages more than fifty nature reserves and other protected sites. It also gives conservation advice to individuals and organisations, provides educational services to young people on field trips and organises entertainment and information events at nature reserves. The NWT reserves include twenty-six Sites of Special Scientific Interests, nine national nature reserves, twelve Nature Conservation Review sites, sixteen Special Areas of Conservation, twelve Special Protection Areas, eleven Ramsar sites, two local nature reserves, four Geological Conservation Review sites and five which are in Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

Coasts[edit | edit source]

Coastal concern action group, Happisburgh

Community and voluntary action[edit | edit source]

Food activism[edit | edit source]

  • Eves Hill Veg Co., community market garden, based just outside the village of Reepham, 10 miles north of Norwich. (added 15:54, 17 January 2020 (UTC))
  • Hunstanton Community Orchard on facebook

Localism[edit | edit source]

Produced In Norfolk

Open spaces[edit | edit source]

The Norfolk Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty is a protected landscape in Norfolk, England. It covers over 450 km2 of coastal and agricultural land from The Wash in the west through coastal marshes and cliffs to the sand dunes at Winterton in the east. It was designated AONB in 1968, under the National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949.

The area includes; Hunstanton, Wells-next-the-Sea, Blakeney, Sheringham, Cromer and Mundesley. The AONB boundary on the seaward side is the mean low water mark, corresponding to the limit of the planning authority of its local authority partners. The terrain behind the coast is rolling chalk land and glacial moraine, including the almost 300 foot (90m) high Cromer Ridge.

Nature reserves in the area include two National Nature Reserves, Blakeney Point and the Winterton Dunes (one of the country's finest dune systems). The Heritage Coast stretch of the AONB is a Site of Special Scientific Interest, a candidate Special Area of Conservation (SAC) and a Special Protection Area. The Peddars Way and Norfolk Coast Path National Trail pass through the AONB.

Wikipedia: Parks and open spaces in Norfolk (category)

Road safety[edit | edit source]

Quiet Lanes is about widening transport choice by looking at ways of managing Norfolk’s minor roadnetwork and the competing uses required of them. This is against a background of rising traffic levels and local peoples' concern about their 'quality of life'. This appears to be done by changing signposting to redirect drivers to alternative routes, thus encouraging use by walkers, cyclists and equestrians.

Rural sustainability[edit | edit source]

Norfolk Rural Community Council, supports communities across Norfolk

Social inclusion[edit | edit source]

Norwich Soup Movement on facebook (added 15:51, 17 January 2020 (UTC))

Sustainable transport activism[edit | edit source]

Walking:

Norfolk County Council manages and promotes a number of long-distance footpaths in the county under the Norfolk Trails brand. The Norfolk Trails network brings together over 1,200 miles of walks, cycle and bridle routes throughout the county of Norfolk. They aim to help people discover the diverse landscape of unique market towns, rich wildlife and cultural heritage which Norfolk is so well known for.

It was initially considered a controversial decision within the walking community, as it involved a focusing of the council's resources for Public Rights of Way on these key routes. However, the trails are expanding to encompass a series of popular circular walks and it is the council's aim is to maintain and promote the Norfolk Trail routes to the same standard as the National Trails.

The Norfolk Coast Path is a long-distance footpath in Norfolk, running 83 miles (133.5 km) from Hunstanton to Hopton-on-Sea. It was opened in 1986 and covers the North Norfolk Coast AONB (Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty).

It links with the Peddars Way at Holme-next-the-Sea, and the two in combination form the Peddars Way & Norfolk Coast Path National Trail, one of 15 National Trails in England and Wales. It links to the Angles Way and the Wherryman's Way at Great Yarmouth, and to both ends of the Weavers' Way, at Cromer and Great Yarmouth. In December 2014, the trail was extended to Sea Palling and forms part of the England Coast Path. In October 2016, the trail was further extended to Hopton-on-Sea.

Wikipedia: Recreational walks in Norfolk, Footpaths in Norfolk (category)


Waterways: The Broads, a well known network of rivers and lakes, is located towards the county's east coast, extending south into Suffolk. The area has the status of a National Park and is protected by the Broads Authority. [1]

The Broads Society is a waterway society in Norfolk and Suffolk, England, UK.

The society was founded in 1956 to provide a focus for anyone interested in the region, e.g. navigators, naturalists, farmers, residents and visitors. It campaigned in the 1960s and 1970s for special status for The Broads, and in 1988 the area was given special protection, a status similar to that of a National Park after the passing of the Norfolk & Suffolk Broads Act 1988.

Today the Broads Society has a membership of about 1200, and it monitors pressures on the unique Broads environment, as well as commenting on planning applications. It is represented on the Broads Authority's Broads Forum.

The Broads Society became a joint owner of the eel sett at Candle Dyke which is the last working sett in the East of England.

The Society's volunteers are known as "Broadsword"; they work during the winter months clearing trees and scrub from river banks. This encourages the re-colonisation of banks by reedswamp and helps maintains the unique environment found in Broadland. It also improves sailing conditions.

The Mission Statement of the Broads Society is as follows:"Our members share a common purpose to help secure a sustainable future for The Broads as a unique and protected landscape in which leisure, tourism and the local economy can thrive in harmony with the natural environment".

Resources[edit | edit source]

News and comment[edit | edit source]

2021

Farmers lead plan to reintroduce white-tailed eagle to Norfolk, Jan 22 [2]

2019

Riba Stirling Prize: Norwich council estate wins architecture award [3] Oct 8

2016

Norfolk now has one million solar panels - enough to power one fifth of all our homes, Jun 17 [4]

2008

Norfolk's low-lying land and easily eroded cliffs, many of which are chalk and clay, make it vulnerable to the sea, the most recent major event being the North Sea flood of 1953. The low-lying section of coast between Kelling and Lowestoft Ness in Suffolk is currently managed by the Environment Agency to protect the Broads from sea flooding. Management policy for the North Norfolk coastline is described in the North Norfolk Shoreline Management Plan which was published in 2006 but has yet to be accepted by the local authorities. The Shoreline Management Plan states that the stretch of coast will be protected for at least another 50 years, but that in the face of sea level rise and post-glacial lowering of land levels in the South East, there is an urgent need for further research to inform future management decisions, including the possibility that the sea defences may have to be realigned to a more sustainable position. Natural England have contributed some research into the impacts on the environment of various realignment options. The draft report of their research was leaked to the press, who created great anxiety by reporting that Natural England plan to abandon a large section of the Norfolk Broads, villages and farmland to the sea to save the rest of the Norfolk coastline from the impact of climate change. [5]

2006

In March 2006, Diss became the third town in the UK to join Cittaslow, an international organisation promoting the concept of 'Slow Towns' [6]

Management of the shoreline[edit | edit source]

Norfolk's low-lying land and easily eroded cliffs, many of which are composed of chalk and clay, make it vulnerable to weathering by the sea. The most recent major erosion event occurred during the North Sea flood of 1953.

The low-lying section of coast between Kelling and Lowestoft Ness in Suffolk is currently managed by the British Environment Agency to protect the Broads from sea flooding. Management policy for the North Norfolk coastline is described in the "North Norfolk Shoreline Management Plan" published in 2006, but has yet to be accepted by local authorities. The Shoreline Management Plan states that the stretch of coast will be protected for at least another 50 years, but that in the event of sea level rise and post-glacial lowering of land levels in the South East, there may a need for further research to inform future management decisions, including the possibility that the sea defences may have to be realigned to a more sustainable position. Natural England have contributed some research into the impacts on the environment of various realignment options. The draft report of their research was leaked to the press, who created great anxiety by reporting that Natural England plan to abandon a large section of the Norfolk Broads, villages and farmland to the sea to save the rest of the Norfolk coastline from the impact of any adverse climate change.

Local communities in Norfolk[edit | edit source]


Scalogo1(png).png


External links[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]