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Ultrasound-based navigational support for visually impaired people

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Literature Review[edit]

Aliaksei Petsiuk (talk) 14:32, 20 May 2019 (PDT)

Target Journal Publisher Impact Factor Link
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Alternative solutions available on market (6/12/2019)[edit]


MOST Papers[edit]

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2018[edit]

Helping Blind People in Their Meeting Locations to Find Each Other Using RFID Technology[edit]

[1] Farshid Sahba, Amin Sahba, Ramin Sahba. Helping Blind People in Their Meeting Locations to Find Each Other Using RFID Technology. International Journal of Computer Science and Information Security (IJCSIS), Vol. 16, No. 12, December 2018.[1]

Abstract This paper presents a new specific system based on RFID technology to help blind people find the other party in their meeting place. This system, uses a device called Smart Director or SD, equipped with Active Tag and RFID Reader. The blind person, the visitor, adjusts the SD with the identification number of the other party who has shared it previously for example on a telephone call, and takes the device to the meeting place. When the blind person arrives at the location, the reader of the device receives signals from the active tag of the other party's SD. It then identifies his/her position based on the intensity and direction of the received signals and tell it to the blind person. In this way, blind people can simply identify the position of the other party in crowded places and find each other.


2017[edit]

Sensor-Based Assistive Devices for Visually-Impaired People: Current Status, Challenges, and Future Directions[edit]

[2] Elmannai W., Elleithy K. Sensor-Based Assistive Devices for Visually-Impaired People: Current Status, Challenges, and Future Directions. Sensors (Basel). 2017 Mar 10;17(3). pii: E565. DOI:10.3390/s17030565. [2]

Abstract The World Health Organization (WHO) reported that there are 285 million visually impaired people worldwide. Among these individuals, there are 39 million who are totally blind. There have been several systems designed to support visually-impaired people and to improve the quality of their lives. Unfortunately, most of these systems are limited in their capabilities. In this paper, we present a comparative survey of the wearable and portable assistive devices for visually impaired people in order to show the progress in assistive technology for this group of people. Thus, the contribution of this literature survey is to discuss in detail the most significant devices that are presented in the literature to assist this population and highlight the improvements, advantages, disadvantages, and accuracy. Our aim is to address and present most of the issues of these systems to pave the way for other researchers to design devices that ensure safety and independent mobility to visually-impaired people.


Low cost ultrasonic smart glasses for blind[edit]

[3] S. Bharambe, R. Thakker, H. Patil, K.M. Bhurchandi. Low cost ultrasonic smart glasses for blind. 2017 8th IEEE Annual Information Technology, Electronics and Mobile Communication Conference (IEMCON). DOI: 10.1109/IEMCON.2017.8117194 [3]

Abstract This device includes a pair of glasses and an obstacle detection module fitted in it in the center, a processing unit, an output device i.e. a beeping component, and a power supply. The Obstacle detection module and the output device is connected to the processing unit. The power supply is used to supply power to the central processing unit. The obstacle detection module basically consists of a ultrasonic sensor, processing unit consist of a control module and the output unit consists of a buzzer. The control unit controls the ultrasonic sensors and get the information of the obstacle present in front of the man and processes the information and sends the output through the buzzer accordingly. These Ultrasonic Smart Glasses for Blind people is a portable device, easy to use, light weight, user friendly and cheap in price. These glasses could easily guide the blind people and help them avoid obstacles.


BrailleBand: Blind Support Haptic Wearable Band for Communication using Braille Language[edit]

[4] H.P. Savindu, K.A. Iroshan, C.D. Panangala, W.L.D.W.P. Perera, A.C De Silva. BrailleBand: Blind Support Haptic Wearable Band for Communication using Braille Language. In proceedings of 2017 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (SMC), pp. 1381-1386. DOI:10.1109/SMC.2017.8122806.[4]

Abstract Visually impaired people are neglected from many modern communication and interaction procedures. Assistive technologies such as text-to-speech and braille displays are the most commonly used means of connecting such visually impaired people with mobile phones and other smart devices. Both these solutions face usability issues, thus this study focused on developing a user friendly wearable solution called the "BrailleBand" with haptic technology while preserving affordability. The "BrailleBand" enables passive reading using the Braille language. Connectivity between the BrailleBand and the smart device (phone) is established using Bluetooth protocol. It consists of six nodes in three bands worn on the arm to map the braille alphabet, which are actuated to give the sense of touch corresponding to the characters. Three mobile applications were developed for training the visually impaired and to integrate existing smart mobile applications such as navigation and short message service (SMS) with the device BrailleBand. The adaptability, usability and efficiency of reading was tested on a sample of blind users which reflected progressive results. Even though, the reading accuracy depends on the time duration between the characters (character gap) an average Character Transfer Rate of 0.4375 characters per second can be achieved with a character gap of 1000 ms.


2015[edit]

Blind Guide: An Ultrasound Sensor-based Body Area Network for Guiding Blind People[edit]

[5] A. Pereira, N. Nunes, D. Vieira, N. Costa, H. Fernandes, J. Barroso. Blind Guide: An Ultrasound Sensor-based Body Area Network for Guiding Blind People. Procedia Computer Science, Volume 67, 2015, Pages 403-408. DOI: 10.1016/j.procs.2015.09.285. [5]

Abstract Wireless Sensor Networks, in particular Wireless Body Area Networks, is a technology suggested by the research community as allowing elderly people, or people with some kind of disability, to live in a safer, responsive and comfortable environment while at their homes. One of the most active threats to the autonomous life of blind people is the quantity and variety of obstacles they face while moving, whether they are obstacles in the footpath or obstacles coming out from the walls of buildings. Hence, it is necessary to develop a solution that helps or assists blind people while moving either in indoor or outdoor scenarios, simultaneously allowing the use of the use of white cane or the Seeing Eye dog. In this article, the authors propose the use of an ultra-sound based body area network for obstacle detection and warning as a complementary and effective solution for aiding blind people when moving from place to place. According to the cost estimates of the solution and to the negligible setup time, this could be a real effective complementary solution for blind people.


Experimental Approach on Affective Aware Systems for Disabled Users[edit]

[6] Y. Mohamad, H. Gappa, G. Nordbrock. Experimental Approach on Affective Aware Systems for Disabled Users. Procedia Computer Science, Volume 67, 2015, Pages 445-451. DOI: 10.1016/j.procs.2015.11.085. [6]

Abstract In this paper, we present an experimental approach to design systems sensitive to user's emotions. We describe a system for the detection of emotional states based on physiological signals and an application use case utilizing the detected emotional state. The application is an emotion management system to be used for the support in the improvement of life conditions of users suffering from cerebral palsy (CP). The system presented here combines effectively biofeedback sensors and a set of software algorithms to detect the current emotional state of the user.


Using Motion Sensors to Support Seating and Positioning Assessments of Individuals with Neurological Disorders[edit]

[7] Y. Iwasaki, T. Hirotomi. Using Motion Sensors to Support Seating and Positioning Assessments of Individuals with Neurological Disorders. Procedia Computer Science, Volume 67, 2015, Pages 113-122. DOI: 10.1016/j.procs.2015.09.255. [7]

Abstract Appropriate postural control can inhibit involuntary movements caused by neurological disorders. Physical and occupational therapists assess individuals with neurological disorders for recommending seating and positioning settings. This paper presents a system to support the therapists by providing acceleration, angular velocity, activity logs and video clips of touch panel operations. The system was used for assessing ten individuals. Root-mean-square values of acceleration and angular velocity of eight body sites reached 83.7% and 74.4% agreement with therapists’ ratings of involuntary movements. Therapists suggested that the data obtained from the system was satisfactory in accuracy and useful for confirming their decisions.


2014[edit]

The “EyeCane”, a new electronic travel aid for the blind: Technology, behavior & swift learning[edit]

[8] Maidenbaum, S., Hanassy, S., Abboud, S., Buchs, G., Chebat, D.-R., Levy-Tzedek, S., Amedi, A. The “EyeCane”, a new electronic travel aid for the blind: Technology, behavior & swift learning. Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, vol. 32, no. 6, pp. 813-824, 2014. DOI: 10.3233/RNN-130351. [8]

Abstract Purpose: Independent mobility is one of the most pressing problems facing people who are blind. We present the EyeCane, a new mobility aid aimed at increasing perception of environment beyond what is provided by the traditional White Cane for tasks such as distance estimation, navigation and obstacle detection. Methods: The “EyeCane” enhances the traditional White Cane by using tactile and auditory output to increase detectable distance and angles. It circumvents the technical pitfalls of other devices, such as weight, short battery life, complex interface schemes, and slow learning curve. It implements multiple beams to enables detection of obstacles at different heights, and narrow beams to provide active sensing that can potentially increase the user's spatial perception of the environment. Participants were tasked with using the EyeCane for several basic tasks with minimal training. Results: Blind and blindfolded-sighted participants were able to use the EyeCane successfully for distance estimation, simple navigation and simple obstacle detection after only several minutes of training. Conclusions: These results demonstrate the EyeCane's potential for mobility rehabilitation. The short training time is especially important since available mobility training resources are limited, not always available, and can be quite expensive and/or entail long waiting periods.


2013[edit]

Substitute Eyes for Blind with Navigator Using Android[edit]

[9] S. Bharambe, R. Thakker, H. Patil, K.M. Bhurchandi. Substitute Eyes for Blind with Navigator Using Android. 2013 Texas Instruments India Educators' Conference. DOI: 10.1109/TIIEC.2013.14. [9]

Abstract Our aim is to develop an affordable technology which is cheap and can be substitute eyes for blind people. As a first step to achieving this goal, we decided to make a Navigation System for the Blind. Our device consists of the following 2 parts: 1) Embedded Device: can be used to detect local obstacles such as walls/cars/etc. using 2 ultrasonic sensors to detect the obstacles and vibrator motors to give tactile feedback to the blind. 2) Android App: will give the navigation directions. Can be installed on any android device: cellphone/tablet/etc.


Silicon eyes: GPS-GSM based navigation assistant for visually impaired using capacitive touch braille keypad and smart SMS facility[edit]

[10] B.R. Prudhvi, Rishab Bagani. Silicon eyes: GPS-GSM based navigation assistant for visually impaired using capacitive touch braille keypad and smart SMS facility. 2013 World Congress on Computer and Information Technology (WCCIT). DOI: 10.1109/WCCIT.2013.6618775.[10]

Abstract This paper proposes an aim to provide blind navigation information via audible messages and haptic feedback, helping the visually disabled to localize where they are and their mobility pathway. This also proposes a method that allows blind people to enter notes and control device operation via Braille capacitive touch keypad instead of sending SMS by entering the number and text. An emergency button triggers an SMS from the GSM module that will send the present location (GPS coordinates) of the user to a remote phone number asking for help. In addition, the device provides the information needed to the user, in audio format using an audio codec, including time, calendar, and object color using a 24-bit color sensor, obstacle distance using SONAR, navigation direction, ambient light, and temperature conditions.


References[edit]

  1. Farshid Sahba, Amin Sahba, Ramin Sahba. Helping Blind People in Their Meeting Locations to Find Each Other Using RFID Technology. International Journal of Computer Science and Information Security (IJCSIS), Vol. 16, No. 12, December 2018.
  2. Elmannai W., Elleithy K. Sensor-Based Assistive Devices for Visually-Impaired People: Current Status, Challenges, and Future Directions. Sensors (Basel). 2017 Mar 10;17(3). pii: E565. DOI:10.3390/s17030565.
  3. R. Agarwal, N. Ladha, M. Agarwal et al. Low cost ultrasonic smart glasses for blind. 2017 8th IEEE Annual Information Technology, Electronics and Mobile Communication Conference (IEMCON). DOI: 10.1109/IEMCON.2017.8117194
  4. H.P. Savindu, K.A. Iroshan, C.D. Panangala, W.L.D.W.P. Perera, A.C De Silva. BrailleBand: Blind Support Haptic Wearable Band for Communication using Braille Language. In proceedings of 2017 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (SMC), pp. 1381-1386. DOI:10.1109/SMC.2017.8122806.
  5. A. Pereira, N. Nunes, D. Vieira, N. Costa, H. Fernandes, J. Barroso. Blind Guide: An Ultrasound Sensor-based Body Area Network for Guiding Blind People. Procedia Computer Science, Volume 67, 2015, Pages 403-408. DOI: 10.1016/j.procs.2015.09.285.
  6. Y. Mohamad, H. Gappa, G. Nordbrock. Experimental Approach on Affective Aware Systems for Disabled Users. Procedia Computer Science, Volume 67, 2015, Pages 445-451. DOI: 10.1016/j.procs.2015.11.085.
  7. Y. Iwasaki, T. Hirotomi. Experimental Using Motion Sensors to Support Seating and Positioning Assessments of Individuals with Neurological Disorders. Procedia Computer Science, Volume 67, 2015, Pages 113-122. DOI: 10.1016/j.procs.2015.09.255.
  8. Maidenbaum, S., Hanassy, S., Abboud, S., Buchs, G., Chebat, D.-R., Levy-Tzedek, S., Amedi, A. The “EyeCane”, a new electronic travel aid for the blind: Technology, behavior & swift learning. Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, vol. 32, no. 6, pp. 813-824, 2014. DOI: 10.3233/RNN-130351
  9. S. Bharambe, R. Thakker, H. Patil, K.M. Bhurchandi. Substitute Eyes for Blind with Navigator Using Android. 2013 Texas Instruments India Educators' Conference. DOI: 10.1109/TIIEC.2013.14
  10. B.R. Prudhvi, Rishab Bagani. Silicon eyes: GPS-GSM based navigation assistant for visually impaired using capacitive touch braille keypad and smart SMS facility. 2013 World Congress on Computer and Information Technology (WCCIT). DOI: 10.1109/WCCIT.2013.6618775