Job loss via automation

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Search Entries[edit | edit source]

  • Job Loss Automation 
  • Job automation between countries
  • Job “automation” impact
  • Job automation industries
  • Job automation substitution of labor
  • Automation low skilled workers
  • Automation job displacment

Who is at risk?: work and automation in the time of COVID-19[edit | edit source]

Wallace-Stephens, F., & Morgante, E. (2020). "Who is at risk?: work and automation in the time of COVID-19."

  • Pandemic rapidly accelerating rate of technological change as well as shining light on possible automated industries going forward
  • Pre-pandemic industries at risk include agriculture, waste management, and simple manufacturing
  • high furlough take up industries are at a high risk of automation

Automation: is it really different this time?.[edit | edit source]

Wajcman, J. (2017). Automation: is it really different this time?. The British journal of sociology, 68(1), 119-127.

Drivers of automation and consequences for jobs in engineering services: an agent-based modelling approach[edit | edit source]

Kyvik Nordås, H., & Klügl, F. (2020). Drivers of automation and consequences for jobs in engineering services: an agent-based modelling approach (No. 2020: 16).

  • How profitable is it to automate a task or industry?
  • Marketing automation and steps prior to automation
  • automating decision making to increase production speed/output

The Substitution of Labor: From Technological Feasibility to Other Factors Influencing Job Automation[edit | edit source]

Teigland, R., van der Zande, J., Teigland, K., & Siri, S. (2018). The Substitution of Labor: From Technological Feasibility to Other Factors Influencing Job Automation. The Substitution of Labor from Technological Feasibility to Other Factors Influencing Job Automation (2018.

  • Repetitive cognitive jobs have a high percentage of automation, such as cashiers, bank tellers, and telephone operators.
  • Routine tasks are most of the time simple to automate, while nonroutine task are more difficult and while possible, often times still requires human oversight.

Exploring the Use of Robotic Process Automation in Local Government[edit | edit source]

Lindgren, I. Exploring the Use of Robotic Process Automation in Local Government. EGOV-CeDEM-ePart 2020, 249.

  • Automating case handling; the process of collecting, managing and assessing information
  • Automating case handling processes will increase efficiency in local government
  • However automating case handling processes will require a restructuring of how case handling processes are run.

The Future of Employment: How Susceptible Are Jobs To Computerization?[edit | edit source]

Frey, C. B., & Osborne, M. A. (2017). The future of employment: How susceptible are jobs to computerisation? Technological Forecasting and Social Change, 114, 254–280. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.techfore.2016.08.019

  • The automation of tasks results in the task only preforming to the ability of the programmer.
  • "routine tasks are not sufficiently well understood to be specified in computer code."
  • Jobs at risk include transportation and logistics occupations

Revisiting the risk of automation[edit | edit source]

Arntz, M., Gregory, T., & Zierahn, U. (2017). Revisiting the risk of automation. Economics Letters, 159, 157-160.

  • Automation risk is low in occupations involved with programming, presenting, training, or influencing others.
  • using the job level approach as opposed to the occupation level approach, overall risk of automation drops from 38% to 9 %
  • Occupation level approach doesn't take non- automatable niches of broad spectrum jobs at a higher risk of automation into account.