About this device
ShovelAssembly.JPG
Keywords 3D printing, shovel, tool, snap together, plastic
Uses development, industry, agriculture
Authors Cleyton Cavallaro
Status Designed
Prototyped
Made? Yes
Replicated? No
Designed in United States
Affiliations MOST
Cost USD $ 11.00
SDGs SDG08 Decent work and economic growth
License data
Hardware CC BY-SA 4.0
Instructions data
Translation data

Snap Together Shovel[edit | edit source]

Project developed by Cleyton Cavallaro

ShovelAssembly.JPG

Abstract[edit | edit source]

This shovel was designed to be a tool that can be fully modulated for the users current needs and environment. Shovels are used everywhere and are almost a necessity if moving large amounts of something dirt like. This shovel can be fully 3D printed if necessary. If the user has access to sticks or branches, the user can print off the wooden shaft attachments instead of the 3D printed shaft, saving time and money. If the user find a piece of scrap sheet metal, they can print off the sheet metal attachment instead of printing the blade, again saving time and money. The handle can either be a straight shaft, or an actual handle to help lift the material easier. Because it is designed with M16 screw/nuts, common parts can easily be substituted from a hardware store. It also does not need any additional hardware other than simple glue to help hold the parts that are printed in pieces. This shovel can have multiple blade types designed to fit it. This can include, dirt blades, snow blades, and other things like rakes or hoes.


Bill of Materials[edit | edit source]

  1. 3D Printer
    1. Upload and link to all source files from open source CAD
    2. Upload and link to all STLs
  2. Additional substitutions:
    1. Sheet metal blade
    2. wood shaft

Tools needed[edit | edit source]

  1. MOST Delta RepRap or similar RepRap 3-D printer
  2. Glue or epoxy
  3. knife


Components Designed for Shovel[edit | edit source]

Technical Specifications and Assembly Instructions[edit | edit source]

  • Print all parts:
    • Blade ~ 12 hours
    • Shaft ~ 2 hours each segment
    • Handle ~ 2 hours
    • If using part substitutions, time will be much shorter.
  • Blade assembly
    • Remove supports
    • Slide piece one into piece two. Final product should look like blade pictured above.
    • Add glue if desired.
  • Shaft Assembly
    • None. If using part substitution, slide both ends of wooden shaft holder onto shaft.
  • Handle assembly
    • Snap both side arms onto the square screw holder. Arms should face away from screw.
    • Attach round handle by sliding onto ends of arms.
    • Add glue if desired.
    • If using part substitution, no assembly required.
  • Final Assembly
    • all pieces screw into each other.

Common Problems and Solutions[edit | edit source]

  • When assembling blade and handle, ensure adequate drying time to provide optimal strength

Cost savings[edit | edit source]

  1. ~ $11 when fully printed
    1. If wooden shaft and/or sheet metal blade are found (for free), cost is ~ $5
  2. Current shovels at Home Depot are ~$20. You would need two to be able to compare to the full modular abilities of the 3D printed shovel.
  3. Savings between $30 and $35 dollars. This is a 75% to 88% savings.