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Obvious 3D printer technology based on 34. Rejecting and regenerating parts

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MOST Delta filament as guide.JPG This page was part of an MTU course MY4777/MY5777/EE4777/EE5777: Open-source 3-D printing

Please leave comments using the discussion tab. The course runs in the Fall semester. It is not open edit.



Noedpatent.jpg
Notice: Broad and/or obvious patent claims for 3-D printing technology may hamper the open-source 3-D printing community's ability to innovate. Previous work on an algorithm protected 3-D printing materials. This page is part of a MTU Open Source 3-D Printing class project to investigate 3-D printing concepts using TRIZ and is presented here as a defensive publication of prior art to help identify obvious 'inventions' for 3-D printing.

Examiners: The ideas on this page dated Dec 3, 2015 and Nov 29, 2016 were developed by university students with less than a semester of formal 3-D printing experience (or by an instructor in class) and thus should be considered unpatentable because of obviousness to any person skilled in the art of additive manufacturing.
Appropedians: This page is open edit. Please fee free to add ideas and sign them below with ~~~~ or to use any of the ideas to built better open-source 3-D printers.


  1. Detect part failure Swallen (talk) 07:34, 3 December 2015 (PST)
    1. Using vision processing to detect print failure
      1. Use a green-screen to measure the printed part outline, then compare to a render of the .stl from the same perspective to detect print failure
        1. Use two cameras from perpendicular perspectives to ensure complete failure detection
    2. Using a proximity sensor on the head to detect head positioning failure
    3. Measuring the weight of the bed to detect extrusion failure
    4. Using a limit switch to detect filament breaks
    5. using a gripping wheel and an encoder to detect filament jams
  2. restart print at point of failure when possible Swallen (talk) 07:34, 3 December 2015 (PST)
    1. Detect where the print left off so it can be restarted from that specific layer
      1. Use vision processing to measure height of printed part
      2. Guess last successful layer based on the point where a failure was detected
      3. Use weight of print bed to measure where the failure occured
      4. Use the print head to measure the part height
        1. Use a touch probe on the print head to measure the height of the printed surface
        2. Use a proximity sensor on the print head to measure the height of the printed surface
    2. Restart print from the exact point in the gcode where the point left off
      1. Find the failed layer in gcode, and start a new print starting at that layer
  3. Fix failed portions of a print Swallen (talk) 07:34, 3 December 2015 (PST)
    1. Remove excess or failed material from print
      1. Use a hot surface to burn away excess material;
      2. Use jets of hot air to burn away excess Material;
      3. Use a solder-sucker type device to remove failed or excess material
      4. use a solder tip to scrape excess material away
    2. Reshape failed portions of the print
      1. use a solder tip to physically reshape failed parts of a print
    3. Reprint failed portions of the print
      1. give the print head more degrees of freedom so it can reprint failed overhangs
  4. Removed the failed print from the bed to clear space to try again Swallen (talk) 07:34, 3 December 2015 (PST)


  1. Stop print after failure before catastrophe Ldstetsk (talk) 07:50, 1 December 2016 (PST)
  2. Recognize skipped layers Ldstetsk (talk) 07:50, 1 December 2016 (PST)
  3. stop print if clogged nozzle Ldstetsk (talk) 07:50, 1 December 2016 (PST)
  4. clean out clogged nozzle Ldstetsk (talk) 07:50, 1 December 2016 (PST)
    1. with physical meansLdstetsk (talk) 07:50, 1 December 2016 (PST)
    2. chemical means Ldstetsk (talk) 07:50, 1 December 2016 (PST)
  5. reusing support structures within same print Ldstetsk (talk) 07:50, 1 December 2016 (PST)
  6. cut away failed overhangs and reprint Ldstetsk (talk) 07:50, 1 December 2016 (PST)
  7. if part fails, knock off bed with end effector and restart print Ldstetsk (talk) 07:50, 1 December 2016 (PST)
  8. melt bottom into base using too hot bed for brief time to adhere to bed better Ldstetsk (talk) 07:50, 1 December 2016 (PST)
  9. cold printing with water Ldstetsk (talk) 07:50, 1 December 2016 (PST)
  10. print very complex ice structures Ldstetsk (talk) 07:50, 1 December 2016 (PST)
  11. print the perfect murder weapon, ice blade that melts after use Ldstetsk (talk) 07:50, 1 December 2016 (PST)
  12. using ice as support structures Ldstetsk (talk) 07:50, 1 December 2016 (PST)
  13. self healing printer, if part falls off, it prints new one Ldstetsk (talk) 07:50, 1 December 2016 (PST)