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Hand Pump Drill (Spring-Loaded)

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Hotend.JPG This page is part of a Principia course ENGR242: 3-D Printing Technology

Please leave comments using the discussion tab. The course runs in the Spring semester. It is not open edit.


Hand Pump Drill (Spring-Loaded)[edit]

Project developed by [Limitless285]
Status
This OSAT has been prototyped.

You can help Appropedia by contributing to the next step in this OSAT's status.

Abstract[edit]

  1. This Hand Pump Drill is a mechanical drill that utilizes human effort to perform the functions of a drill. In locations where power tools are too expensive or there is little access to electricity, a hand drill is an effective solution. 3D printing these means they can be very cost efficient - less than $0.25 in filament, a spring, and drill bits.
  2. First Draft First Draft
  3. First Draft w/ Spring Handdrill2.PNG
  4. Final Draft image coming soon!

Bill of Materials[edit]

  1. Materials Needed:
    1. Drill Bit(s) of varying sizes - any standard drill bits should fit this drill.
    2. (OPTIONAL) Spring to have spring-loaded capabilities: Purchase here
    3. STLs and Open-Source (Blender) Source Files Download

Tools needed for fabrication of the OSAT[edit]

  1. Jellybox or similar RepRap 3-D printer

Technical Specifications and Assembly Instructions[edit]

  • This print should take about 4 hours (I printed three different prints - one with 3 pieces, one with 2, and one with 1). These could all be printed in one go, reducing print time drastically.
  • Assembly should take no more than 5 to 10 minutes.
  1. Print all part at .1 mm resolution (lower resolution may still work, but have not been tested)
  2. All parts should be printed vertically. The end-handle should be printed with the hole on the narrow end facing up.
  3. Insert spring-slide over the drill body. After a few rotations, it should revolve smoothly.
  4. Place the chuck-jaws into the drill body with the jaw-cover screwing into the body over the chuck-jaws
    1. If a spring is being used, place the spring Spring sized for this print over the drill body before securing the jaw-cover
  5. Attach the end handle to the spring-slide

Common Problems and Solutions[edit]

  • Apply lubricant to the drill body (should not be necessary)
  • Ensuring the end-handle is printed with the hole facing up ensures accurate sizing and print quality for a snap-fit.

Cost savings[edit]

  • If your solution is not a low cost one then it is not really appropriate.
  1. Costs for this hand-drill
  • 3D printed drill = $.25
  • Drill bit = $1.31 each Source Link
  • OPTIONAL Spring = $1.40 each Source Link
  • TOTAL: $ 2.76
  1. Commercial Equivalent
  • $72.50 Spring Loaded Push Drill Source Link
  • $15 for shipping per their calculated shipping policy
  • TOTAL: $87.50
  1. $ savings and % savings
  • A total savings of $84.74, or more than 3000% in savings.

[[Category:Tools]] [[Category:Hand Tools]] [[Category:Drills]].