Kelp, also known as bladderwrack.

Kelp is a water plant, so never goes into submission as it generally thrives where the water temperature is high enough to sustain life.

Uses for kelp[edit | edit source]

Parts used: whole plant. Constituents: mucilage, mannitol, volatile oil, potassium, iodine, and many other minerals

Medicinal[edit | edit source]

Medical: Colds, fractures, psoriasis, goiter, kidneys, diabetes, general tonic, obesity, heart problems, eczema, glands, builds blood vessels, menopause, hypoglycemia, constipation, dry skin, prostate/adrenal/pituitary/thyroid, colitis, cold hands/feet, slow nail growth, neres, arteries, nausea, morning sickness, brittle hair, skin ailments, anemia, fat hips, arthritis/rheumatism/joints (interior and exterior), fatigue, cancer, pregnancy, bursitis, hot flashes.[verification needed] Many of these are cause by low iodine levels, which kelp is extremely high in. Kelp also helps transmit minerals in the body.[verification needed]

For pain relief and to lower inflammation for arthritis, use an external compress and plaster.

Other uses[edit | edit source]

In great amount, kelp ash can be use in soap and glass making. It is also used as a thickening agent in food.

How to prepare: You can make an infusion of kelp. Also if you own a mortar and pestle you can grind it up and use it in pill form.

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Published 2006
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