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Commute by human power

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Walking and biking are great for your health (look at how slim the average Dutch person is, in spite of the fries with masses of mayonnaise). Like any physical activity, it will improve your wellbeing and state of mind. It will also save your bank account at the same time as saving the planet.

  • cycle
  • Walk
  • Jog or run - save gym fees and get fit. Make sure you get good advice on whether this is good for you. Have your gait tested, and get suitable shoes, to protect your body, especially your feet, knees and back.

Practical questions: sweat and rain[edit]

Not every office has a shower. However you may find that having a good absorbent towel is enough to remove the light sweat of a morning ride.

Not every office has a change area. You can probably change a shirt at least in the staff bathroom; otherwise, work out clothes that you can wear on the bike that are also suitable for the office. (That's assuming the weather and distance aren't enough to build up a heavy sweat.)

Areas where cycling is common, people learn to deal with the weather. Look at how they protect themselves from the weather.please expand

Transporting children[edit]

  • Pedicabs or cycle rickshaws enable you to take at least two children, in a more protected vehicle than a bicycle.
  • Walk bus

Unusual examples - think outside the box[edit]

  • Pedal boat: If you have to cross a calm water body to get to work, this is a great way to travel. A resident of Seattle works on Bainbridge Island, and commutes this way, saving 30 minutes each way, compared to a 45 minute trip by commuter ferry and bus. She has also seen dolphins and otters, which she would never have seen from the ferry.[1]
  • Personal conversation with this person's co-worker on Bainbridge