Get our free book on rainwater now - To Catch the Rain.

Engr215 Introduction to Design syllabus

From Appropedia
Revision as of 01:42, 18 January 2012 by 137.150.109.206 (Talk) (Course Objectives: new objectives)

Jump to: navigation, search

Welcome

Welcome to ENGR 215 Introduction to Design. This is a 3-credit course aimed at introducing the student to the engineering design process, including critical analysis of problems, teamwork and technical communication. The course meets weekly for 2 hours of lecture and 3 hours of lab. However, these “lecture” periods and “lab” periods will be used for multiple learning formats as this course will integrate lecture, discussion, student projects, computer labs and outdoor field activities. It will require active learning on your part. If you have any type of disability that may hamper your full participation in these activities, please inform your instructor as soon as possible so that we can make the appropriate accommodations. Check out the Student Disability Resource Center for more information on the services provided at HSU.

Course Objectives

  • Students will learn about and experience the engineering design process with a sustainability focus.
  • Students will further develop the many computing skills needed by practicing engineers and scientists. These skills include:
    • word processing
    • spreadsheet
    • CAD (Computer Aided Design)
    • Internet skills, including email, web searches and web/wiki pages
  • Students will further develop the many communication skills needed by practicing engineers and scientists. These skills include:
    • written communication
    • verbal and visual presentation skills
    • teamwork (including feedback)

This course addresses the following Environmental Resources Engineering program objectives:

  • I. ERE graduates will be able to apply the tools and concepts of mathematics, basic sciences, and engineering science in engineering practice.
  • II. ERE graduates will be prepared and understand the need to continue their life-long education in mathematics, basic sciences, and engineering science, design, and practice.
  • III. ERE graduates will have developed an understanding and an appreciation of the historical, social and political context of the environmental resources problems that will engage them in their careers.
  • IV. ERE graduates will be able to effectively and professionally communicate ideas and technical information to the public and to fellow and other professionals in written and oral reports.
  • V. ERE graduates have the ability to design systems, components, processes and procedures to meet specified objectives, with an emphasis on designs for managing environmental resources.
  • VII. ERE graduates will be able to work effectively in multi-disciplinary (*definition*) teams and, when necessary, to pro-actively resolve problems with team dynamics.
  • IX. ERE graduates will be prepared to assume a leadership role in the profession based upon their engineering science and design experience with traditional and nontraditional solutions to environmental problems.
  • X. ERE graduates will have a professional attitude and ethical responsibility to their client and their community in terms of the legal, economic, technical, and the environmental aspects of their role.
  • XII. ERE graduates will have the ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.

Grading

You are expected to attend and participate in all class sessions. You are expected to complete the assigned reading prior to the date indicated on the class schedule, to do all homework assignments, and to participate fully in the team projects. Your fellow students will evaluate your performance on the team projects. Attendance at all group/teamwork sessions is mandatory. If you have more than 3 unexcused absences, you will receive an F in the course.

  • 50% Design Project Report (Design Team)
  • 15% Peer Evaluation (Design Team)
  • 8% Rube Goldberg Design Project (Design Group)
  • 22% Lab and Class assignments (Individual and Group Work)
  • 5% Class Portfolio (Individual Work)

Late Assignments

Assignments that are submitted after the due date without prior instructor approval will be severely penalized or not accepted.

Make-up assignments will only be accepted in extraordinary situations that are verifiable and well documented. The reason for missing work must be substantial and quite beyond the student’s control.

Academic Honesty

Throughout this course, the sharing of ideas will often be educationally useful. Part of my teaching philosophy is to encourage students to learn from one another and to help fellow students to learn. The team projects illustrate the collaborative approach.

Collaboration on coursework is authorized in this course provided that it is done in the spirit of mutual learning and sharing of ideas. When this occurs, you should indicate the names of all persons with whom you collaborated. The copying of someone else’s work or ideas and representing them as your own is unethical and prohibited. As in most, if not all issues involving ethical considerations, it may be hard to know where to draw the line. If you do not provide the names of your co-workers, I will presume the collaboration is copying, not mutual learning. If you do collaborate, it must be noted and you are still responsible for understanding all the material.

You should read: The official Student Code of Conduct and HSU’s Policy of Academic Honesty.

I expect all students to abide by the HSU Code of Conduct.

Professional Ethics

Below are some URLs that provide useful information of the ASCE code of ethics for Professional Engineers and ethics for engineering and science.

Course Materials

  • Memory stick or other device to back up files
  • Presentation materials for final project poster and for final project document
  • Up to $100.00 in project materials ($25 – Rube Goldberg, $75 – Design Project)

Attendance

Attendance at all class/lab sessions is mandatory. If you will miss a session, you must contact your instructor in advance to arrange a make up or alternate exercise. Failure to do so will result in a grade penalty. If you have more than 3 unexcused absences, you will receive an F in the course.

Makes-ups will only be given in extraordinary situations that are verifiable and well documented. The reason for missing work must be substantial and quite beyond the student’s control. Not many excuses are accepted. The instructor will decide whether an excuse is acceptable. One criterion for acceptance of any excuse will be its timeliness. Therefore, whenever possible, inform me before the missed work is due.

Students are responsible for knowing policy regarding attendance and disruptive behavior: http://studentaffairs.humboldt.edu/judicial/attendance_behavior.php

Building Access

We are incredibly lucky to have a building and resources open to students at all hours, but you MUST get a keycard to enter the building after hours. To do so, register here. As a very fair consideration, you should NEVER prop open the door to the building. If you abuse your privileges, you risk losing after hours building access.

Students with Disabilities

If you have any type of disability that may hamper your full participation in course activities, it is your responsibility to inform me of your need for accommodations as soon as possible. I expect to hear from you within the first two weeks of the semester so that appropriate accommodations can be arranged. Complete information on the services available at HSU can be found at the Student Disability Resource Center (SDRC) in House 71, 826-4678 (voice) or 826-5392 (TDD) or on their website http://www.humboldt.edu/~sdrc/. Some accommodations may take up to several weeks to arrange.

If you qualify for extra time on exams or need other accommodations, it is your responsibility to obtain and provide me with the Exam Accommodation Request form from the SDRC. The form must be presented to me in a timely manner so appropriate arrangements can be made in advance for all exams. I strongly recommend submitting the form at the beginning of the semester or at least one week before the first exam that you wish to use accommodations. It is also strongly recommended that you communicate eligible accommodations and scheduling arrangements with me one week prior to exams. This will ensure your test accommodation arrangements are completed in a timely manner.

Add/Drop policy

Students are responsible for knowing the University policy, procedures, and schedule for dropping or adding classes. http://www.humboldt.edu/~reg/regulations/schedadjust.html

Emergency evacuation

Please review the evacuation plan for the classroom (posted on the orange signs), and review Campus Emergency Preparedness for information on campus Emergency Procedures. During an emergency, information can be found campus conditions at: 826-INFO or http://www.humboldt.edu/emergency

Previous Design Projects

See E215 Introduction to Design projects for a photo gallery view of past projects.