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Difference between revisions of "10' Hexayurt"

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'''The 10 Foot Hexayurt''' aka '''The Mark II''' aka '''the H15'''
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'''The H15 Hexayurt''' aka '''The 10' Hexayurt'''
  
The 10 foot Hexayurt is like the standard 8' hexayurt, with the wall height increased by 2 feet to make more livable headroom [http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc4/hs642.snc4/60205_463122598071_546703071_6512076_6776629_n.jpg]. The lowest point is 6 feet tall, the peak of the roof is 10 feet. This makes your entryway a better size for the average person's height.  It requires 3 more panels than the 8' hexayurt (which requires 12 panels), and so it has been re-named the "H15."  It has also been called the '''Mark II,''' which sounds more inspiring than either other name. If you're interested in having better height at your entryway, but don't want to spend too much more money on panels, try the [[Hexayurt H13]], which is a trickier design but very elegant, especially if a portion of your living space is used for sleeping and doesn't require standing room.
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The H15 Hexayurt is like the standard 8' hexayurt, with the wall height increased by 2 feet to make more livable headroom [http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc4/hs642.snc4/60205_463122598071_546703071_6512076_6776629_n.jpg]. The lowest point is 6 feet tall, the peak of the roof is 10 feet. This makes your entryway a better size for the average person's height.  It requires 3 more panels than the 8' hexayurt (which requires 12 panels), and so it has been re-named the "H15."  It has also been called the '''Mark II,''' which sounds more inspiring than either other name. If you're interested in having better height at your entryway, but don't want to spend too much more money on panels, try the [[Hexayurt H13]], which is a trickier design but very elegant, especially if a portion of your living space is used for sleeping and doesn't require standing room.
 
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If you are 6 feet tall or taller, and disdain stooping your mighty head, you might consider increasing height by 3 feet by adding 4 more panels. Perhaps this can be called the '''Mark III.''' There are no pictures available of this design, but you can extrapolate easily off of the Mark II PDF below. The major drawback to this design is that it will not have an efficient shipping footprint--3 foot panel segments will not stack nicely in your 4'x8' stack, but you might bundle them in a separate stack that's 3'x8'.
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This is not as elegant a design as the H13, but it's more structurally sound, given that your tape-ring is not cut into with the addition of the door, and it's symmetrical on all axes. The roof hinges are the same as the classic 8' hexayurt, each of the 6 wall panels have the 2' addition either hinged on, or taped on one you hit playa.
'''This page is under construction.''' For now, see [http://www.appropedia.org/Hexayurt_Camp_Danger_two_part_folding#Other_Shapes.2C_Increased_Height 10' hexayurt aka Mark II] as a semi-folding hexayurt using Camp-Danger Hinges.
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It would appear H15's have survived [http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc4/hs642.snc4/60205_463122598071_546703071_6512076_6776629_n.jpg at Burning Man], and were playa tested in the nasty 2012 winds. Even the H15's made with 1" thick panels survived. FYI, Julie Danger camps in an H15 made with 1" thick panels...but really, 1.5 thick panels would be better for this increased height. For the ''best'' structural stability, you would stagger the 2' addition top and bottom when you build the walls, and it would still ship in the 4'x8' stack. However, that's a lot of extra on-playa work that no one is willing to do...if you can ship and store the yurt in a 6x8' stack, definitely stagger each wall section. If you're going to be lazy and make 4 pre-folded wall sections, be sure that your 2x8' wall additions are staggered (see PDF 'front and back view').
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'''Follow PDF''' for the 6'x8' variety, aka best structural integrity: [[http://www.appropedia.org/File:6x8_H15_Hexayurt_instructional.pdf]]<br />
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'''Follow this PDF''' for the lazy, less stable, but playa tested H15, with 4 wall sections (most common version seen on-playa): [[http://www.appropedia.org/File:Danger_H15_Hexayurt_instructional_2013.pdf]]
  
 
More to come!
 
More to come!

Revision as of 20:42, 15 July 2013

The H15 Hexayurt aka The 10' Hexayurt

The H15 Hexayurt is like the standard 8' hexayurt, with the wall height increased by 2 feet to make more livable headroom [1]. The lowest point is 6 feet tall, the peak of the roof is 10 feet. This makes your entryway a better size for the average person's height. It requires 3 more panels than the 8' hexayurt (which requires 12 panels), and so it has been re-named the "H15." It has also been called the Mark II, which sounds more inspiring than either other name. If you're interested in having better height at your entryway, but don't want to spend too much more money on panels, try the Hexayurt H13, which is a trickier design but very elegant, especially if a portion of your living space is used for sleeping and doesn't require standing room.

This is not as elegant a design as the H13, but it's more structurally sound, given that your tape-ring is not cut into with the addition of the door, and it's symmetrical on all axes. The roof hinges are the same as the classic 8' hexayurt, each of the 6 wall panels have the 2' addition either hinged on, or taped on one you hit playa.

It would appear H15's have survived at Burning Man, and were playa tested in the nasty 2012 winds. Even the H15's made with 1" thick panels survived. FYI, Julie Danger camps in an H15 made with 1" thick panels...but really, 1.5 thick panels would be better for this increased height. For the best structural stability, you would stagger the 2' addition top and bottom when you build the walls, and it would still ship in the 4'x8' stack. However, that's a lot of extra on-playa work that no one is willing to do...if you can ship and store the yurt in a 6x8' stack, definitely stagger each wall section. If you're going to be lazy and make 4 pre-folded wall sections, be sure that your 2x8' wall additions are staggered (see PDF 'front and back view').

Follow PDF for the 6'x8' variety, aka best structural integrity: [[2]]
Follow this PDF for the lazy, less stable, but playa tested H15, with 4 wall sections (most common version seen on-playa): [[3]]

More to come!