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Nanoparticles

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A nanoparticle which historically has included nanopowder, nanocluster, and nanocrystal is a small particle with at least one dimension less than 100 nm.

Sustainable Development Uses[edit]

Nanoparticles can be used to:

Nanoparticles and the Environment[edit]

Nanoparticles present possible dangers, both medically and environmentally.[1] Most of these are due to the high surface to volume ratio, which can make the particles very reactive or catalytic.[2] They are also able to pass through cell membranes in organisms, and their interactions with biological systems are relatively unknown.[3] However, free nanoparticles in the environment quickly tend to agglomerate and thus leave the nano-regime, and nature itself presents many nanoparticles to which organisms on earth may have evolved immunity (such as salt particulates from ocean aerosols, terpenes from plants, or dust from volcanic eruptions). A fuller analysis is provided in the article on nanotechnology.

According to the San Francisco Chronicle, "Animal studies have shown that some nanoparticles can penetrate cells and tissues, move through the body and brain and cause biochemical damage. But whether cosmetics and sunscreens containing nanomaterials pose health risks remains largely unknown, pending completion of long-range studies recently begun by the FDA and other agencies."[4]

Diesel nanoparticles have been found to damage the cardiovascular system in a mouse model.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Anisa Mnyusiwalla, Abdallah S Daar and Peter A Singer 2003 Nanotechnology 14 R9-R13 doi:10.1088/0957-4484/14/3/201
  2. Ying, Jackie. Nanostructured Materials. New York: Academic Press, 2001.
  3. Nanotechnologies: 6. What are potential harmful effects of nanoparticles?
  4. Keay Davidson, FDA urged to limit nanoparticle use in cosmetics and sunscreens|publisher,San Francisco Chronicle, [1]
  5. http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=washingtonstory&sid=aBt.yLf.YfOo study Pollution Particles Lead to Higher Heart Attack Risk (Update1)

Interwiki links[edit]