Dill

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Anethumfield.png

Dill (Anethum graveolens) is a hardy annual herb. This plant has been appreciated by human beings since ancient times.

Description[edit | edit source]

Dill has leaves that are similar to fennel, feathery and light. It has yellow flowers that grow in large umbrella like heads.

It can reach a growth height of up to 1 metre or 3 feet.

Growing dill[edit | edit source]

Sow dill seed in place in the garden. If you try to grow elsewhere, then transplant them, there is a risk that the plant will try to bolt to seed, as it doesn't take well to disturbance. When seedlings have grown, thin to allow the stronger ones you've selected to grow about 15cm apart.

Have a form of support near dill, such as several dill plants together, climbing plants, a few sticks in the ground, etc.

Using dill[edit | edit source]

Dill leaves are very delicate. If you wish to dry them to keep for later use, you'll need a considerable amount. The seeds are easier to dry.

Culinary[edit | edit source]

Dill is a good addition to soups, salads and fish dishes. Dill is an excellent companion to potatoes, as it brings out the potato's own flavour. It is used in some Mediterranean dishes.

Chopped leaves and flowers can be used in fish soup or chowder. Dill sauce can be made for use on fish dishes, a commonplace use in Scandinavia.

If cooking with dill leaves or flowers, do not cook for too long as they are very delicate and will disintegrate if cooked at length. Add just before the dish has completed its cooking time.

Dill seeds are edible and can be added to pickles such as gherkin or cucumber pickles. Dill seeds can be added to wine vinegar for a pleasant sharp and slightly bitter flavour.

Medicinal[edit | edit source]

Dill seeds can be soaked in water as a remedy to soothe hiccups and stomachaches from indigestion. The old-fashioned remedy of "gripe water" for babies was once made from dill seeds.