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Difference between revisions of "Kerala"

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Kerala, a Southern state of [[India]], is often noted for its successes in development, achieving [[quality of life]] measures similar to those in Western countries, in spite of its economic problems and much lower per capita income, and an [[ecological footprint]] of 0.7 - i.e. each person uses only 70% of the natural resources that they are entitled to for a sustainable world.{{fact}}{{expand}}
 
Kerala, a Southern state of [[India]], is often noted for its successes in development, achieving [[quality of life]] measures similar to those in Western countries, in spite of its economic problems and much lower per capita income, and an [[ecological footprint]] of 0.7 - i.e. each person uses only 70% of the natural resources that they are entitled to for a sustainable world.{{fact}}{{expand}}
  
It has received attention from numerous development economists, including Amartya Sen,{{wp sup|Amartya Sen}} who makes comparisons between China's achievement of social and public health goals (including low birthrate) through [[coercion]], and Kerala's slightly better achievements through [[education]] and [[empowerment]].
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It has received attention from numerous development economists, including Amartya Sen,{{wp sup|Amartya Sen}} who makes comparisons between China's achievement of social and public health goals (including low birthrate) through [[Glossary_of_sustainability_terms#C|coercion]], and Kerala's slightly better achievements through [[education]] and [[empowerment]].
  
 
== Interwiki links ==
 
== Interwiki links ==

Revision as of 13:00, 18 April 2013

Kerala, a Southern state of India, is often noted for its successes in development, achieving quality of life measures similar to those in Western countries, in spite of its economic problems and much lower per capita income, and an ecological footprint of 0.7 - i.e. each person uses only 70% of the natural resources that they are entitled to for a sustainable world.[verification needed]please expand

It has received attention from numerous development economists, including Amartya Sen,W who makes comparisons between China's achievement of social and public health goals (including low birthrate) through coercion, and Kerala's slightly better achievements through education and empowerment.

Interwiki links

Written references

External links