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JMC330 Project Page in Progress
This page is a project page in progress by students in JMC330. Please refrain from making edits unless you are a member of the project team, but feel free to make comments using the discussion tab. Check back for the finished version on May 15, 2010.





Solar Power in Liberia:[edit]

Africa is in the middle of a solar revolution, “Liberia is richly endowed with tropical rainforests, iron ore, diamonds, and gold. The abusive exploitation of these natural resources has helped fuel Liberia’s continuing conflict. Strong environmental laws and communities that participate in environment decision making hold the promise of helping to bring peace to Liberia, while protecting the nation’s valuable natural resources. Green Advocates drew support from environmental attorneys around the world who participate in the E-LAW “ to draft Liberia’s first framework environmental law. “E-LAW” partners reviewed and commented on the draft and Green Advocates help workshops to help communities participate in the drafting process. In 2002, Liberia passed “National Environmental Policy of Liberia”, Environmental Protection Agency, and the Environment Protection and Management Law. [1]



CREATIVE program:[edit]

During the search for solar power the program of “Creative” has donated the research to provide Liberia with sustainable power. Creative, has donated items such as solar powered radios and lanterns for teachers and students to use during their night classes for overage war affected youth and women. The teachers use the radios for teacher training broadcasts and the students use the lanterns to keep fuel costs low by not running the generators. With gas prices at over $4.40 a gallon and other technology still very expensive in Liberia this can be far more sustainable[2]“Liberia is richly endowed with tropical rainforests, iron ore, diamonds, and gold. The abusive exploitation of these natural resources has helped fuel Liberia’s continuing conflict. Strong environmental laws and communities that participate in environment decision making hold the promise of helping to bring peace to Liberia, while protecting the nation’s valuable natural resources.”


African Energy:[edit]

“African Energy is a specialized distributor of solar electric and power back-up equipment focusing exclusively on the African market. We sell only to Africa, and concentrate primarily on serving the needs of renewable energy companies based there. Because of our specific focus, we receive exceptional pricing from the manufacturers we represent, and we understand the challenges of doing business in Africa. Door to door shipment, 24-hour service, flexible payment arrangements, and the continent's best prices. We carry Trace/Xantrex, Outback, Photowatt, GE Energy, Morningstar, Steca, Suntech, Southwest Wind, Surrette, Deka, Sundanzer and other fine brands.” • Business type: wholesale supplier, exporter, system sales, specialized retail sales • Product types: solar electric power systems, wind energy systems (small), wind energy system components (small), photovoltaic modules, photovoltaic systems, solar water pumping systems, solar refrigeration systems, uninterruptible power supplies UPS, Solar Home Systems. • Service types: system design, training • Address: Box 97, Saint David, Arizona USA, Tunisia, Morocco, Senegal, Gambia, Guinea (Conakry), Mali, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Nigeria, Cameroon, Chad, Congo (DRC), Angola, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Malawi, Rwanda, Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, Algeria, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Niger, Gabon, Madagascar, Mozambique, Burundi, Djibouti, Somalia 85630 • Telephone: 1-520-720-9475 • FAX: 1-520-720-9527 • Web Site: http://www.africanenergy.com • E-mail: Send Email to African Energy [3]

FACTS: Impact of the Liberian Books Project Activities- In Liberia: • 300,000 gently used books for literacy centers • 1,200 trained teachers • 1,200 literacy centers • 10 Megawatts of renewable electricity—wind and solar power to Liberian schools In the US: • 1,200 trained literacy tutors to work in US communities • 120 US trained teachers • 1 Megawatt of renewable electricity—wind and solar power for US communities.


PROVISION OF ALTERNATIVE ENERGY:[edit]

As a result of 14 years of civil crisis, the entire electrical grid of Liberia is destroyed. About 97% of Liberian households are without state generated electricity. Power is produced from individual generators, which uses gasoline and diesel. This is not environmentally friendly and extremely expensive. In partnership with the CBR Program and other stakeholders, the Environment Programme piloted the solar panel technology in 2 of Liberia's remote communities. The first solar panel was dedicated in U-Lah town in Bong County and the facility provides electricity to the U-Lah public school and the community midwifery clinic. The second solar panel is located in Jundu in Grand Cape Mount County. That facility provides electricity to the community clinic, the community center and the public school. Solar power is a clean, renewable resource, which does not negatively impact the environment. It conforms to the principles of the clean developments mechanism of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and its Kyoto Protocol. [[1]]

  • A few Liberian groups are testing out a new business using empty plastic water bottles to make solar-powered lanterns with three tiny LED (light-emitting diode) bulbs. The small lantern serves as a flashlight or flexes to become a reading light.

• The solar torch was developed and donated by Green Energies, LLC, for micro-enterprises in Tanzania. A start-up assembly tool kit costs $100 and light kits are $15 each. The lanterns are sold for about $25 each, including a small (1.5W) solar panel for recharging the batteries. • In Liberia, people can spend up to $15 each month on kerosene and candles, so makers of the small lights expect brisk sales. After training, a person can assemble four or five lights in a day.— New York Times