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User:SammyKeller

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Status
This OSAT has been designed but not yet tested - use at own risk.
This OSAT has been modeled.
Hotend.JPG This page is part of a Principia course ENGR242: 3-D Printing Technology

Please leave comments using the discussion tab. The course runs in the Spring semester. It is not open edit.



Introduction[edit]

MyFace.JPG


Howdy Doody, Appropedia folks. My name is Samuel Keller, but you can call me Sammy. I am a Political Science and Global Studies major at Principia College. I am currently taking ENGR 242 (3D Printing Technologies). I'll be honest, I'm mainly taking the class because it fulfills a General Education requirement (my college is a liberal arts school). However, I have come to really enjoy 3D printing and I'm saying that after just finishing the build of my Jellybox 1.3. It was incredibly frustrating, but the first print did feel very satisfying. Our professor, Dr. Marie Farson, introduced us to the world of the Open Source movement. Open Source means that everybody has free access to the project. Everybody has free access to the product, but people can also make changes, improvements, and modifications to the source and make that available to the public as well. I think that's really cool. Something like 3D printing technologies is something that is maybe not as widely spoken about because it seems to fairly complicated. Well, it is, but anybody can learn it. I have no experience in Engineering, I study Politics and I was able to do it. My only prior experience is that I played with Legos growing up. By making the products publicly available for free, it incentives people to give it a try because the investments in this technology are fairly low. Just because it is Open Sources does not mean that you can't make money from it. One of the creators of Jellybox made money by selling 3D printed replacement parts for the printer. Since we use the Jellybox model, we thereby participated in the Open Source movement. Yeehaw! Like I said previously, I've come to enjoy 3D printing and I'm kind of fascinated with how the printer works. I'm still learning to understand more about it, but I think I can see myself keeping it up in the future as a hobby.


Projects[edit]

House Project
HouseProject.JPG This was the house project that we were asked to print. It looks pretty good. There's a minor gap on the roof. I'm figuring out how to fix that. Overall, it turned out really nice, though.
My First Print
FirstPrint.JPG This was my first print. It's a spiral cube with a base to rest in. It looks really cool. I used Esteban's filament for the base. I printed this before I printed the house above. There's no issues with this print, so I'm not sure what happened between the two prints that could have messed with my prints.

By JustinSDK. Licensed under the Creative Commons - Attribution - Non-Commercial - Share Alike license.[1]

Jellybox Replacement Part
Fan.JPEG For this project, I decided to print a fan cover replacement part.[2] The original file had the cover all filled in, which I accidentally printed. I printed it again with a Tri-Hexagon shape with an infill density of about 50%.
Blender Exercise
Pyramid.JPEG We learned how to use Blender (Version 2.79). I'm still figuring it out, but that's just the beauty of technology and different programs. It's quite tricky, but I think the pyramid turned out pretty well. This is the second print of this design. The face on the lid was a little too big, so I had to make it a little smaller in Blender.

Licensed under the Creative Commons - Attribution - Non-Commercial - Share Alike license.

FreeCAD Exercise
Yeet.JPG We learned the basics of FreeCAD. We designed the design you can see in the picture in class and printed it. I really like how it turned out. I printed it with 10% infill % and 0.3mm layer height. I really did not like working with this program. I kept getting error messages, despite using different computers and following the tutorial step by step. I definitely like Blender a lot better.

Licensed under the Creative Commons - Attribution - Non-Commercial - Share Alike license.

OpenSCAD Exercise
Coin.JPG We learned the basics of OpenSCAD. We designed this coin holder and we reshaped a rock wall holder for homework. I think that this program is definitely easy to use when you're good with coding, but this program is seriously giving me a headache. I hate that it doesn't tell me what's wrong. It just puts a red dot somewhere and then I check on that line, but there's nothing wrong on that line.

Licensed under the Creative Commons - Attribution - Non-Commercial - Share Alike license.

Science Equipment
Tube Holder adaptor.JPG Now that we learned the basics of the various programs, we were tasked to design a piece of science equipment for one of the science professors at our college. I got in touch with one of our Biology professors, Chrissy, and asked her if she needed something. She asked me to design an adaptor for one of her test tube cold blocks. She was having trouble with it. The holes on the cold block were too big and wouldn't hold the tubes properly in place. The adaptor that I designed is just put over the actual holes and adds a thin layer (2 mm) so that the tubes still sit in the cold block. I had six prints total, including the prototype. Given that this is 3D printed and can be modified, it meant that the professor didn't have to buy a new cold block, which would have cost her upwards of $100. Instead, this was less than $1 worth of filament (not including time for designing it).

Designed in FreeCad.

OSAT Project Prototype
Pillss.PNG For our next project, we went onto the OSAT project requests page on Appropedia and picked a project to work on. I'm currently working on a pill holder to hold daily pills for up to 14 days that someone requested. This is my prototype so far- I'm currently trying to figure out how to make it better and come up with a creative way for the lid to only open one compartment at a time so that all the pills don't fall out if you were to knock it over while having a compartment open.

Designed in FreeCad.

Licensed under the Creative Commons - Attribution - Non-Commercial - Share Alike license.

OSAT Project Final
Pillbox.JPEG For our next project, we went onto the OSAT project requests page on Appropedia and picked a project to work on. I created a pill holder to hold daily pills for up to 14 days that a professor at Penn State University requested. This is my final project. I initially had a different idea for the lid that would be more efficient and prevent pills from flying everywhere if the dispenser was to be knocked over, but my idea didn't work out, unfortunately. The plan was to have separate slide-in lids, but they wouldn't hold properly. Therefore I went with a standard lid. These pill holders are usually pretty cheap, the closest one to this that I found at $6 apiece [3], but you don't really find pill holders for more than a week, so that's where this design has a leg up to commercially sold pill holders.

My pill holder has a production cost of roughly $2.5 (65 grams total at roughly 4ct/gram), so you save roughly 60% of the cost.

The file can be downloaded here [4]

Licensed under the Creative Commons - Attribution - Non-Commercial - Share Alike license.


Videos[edit]

jellybox print

Userboxes[edit]

Userboxes
Oshw-logo.png This user is a member with interest and knowledge of Open Source Hardware.
Reprap.png This user is a member with an interest and knowledge of 3-D printing.

Picture gallery[edit]

title of gallery for pictures
OSL