Medical equipment data
Page data
Part of Tibial Fracture Fixation
Type Medical course
Keywords orthopedic surgery, surgical training, tibial fracture, bicortical drilling, modular external fixation, open tibial shaft fracture, 3D printing, artificial bones
SDG Sustainable Development Goals SDG03 Good health and well-being
Authors Medical Makers
Published 2021
License CC-BY-SA-4.0
Affiliations Medical Makers
Impact Number of views to this page. Views by admins and bots are not counted. Multiple views during the same session are counted as one. 170

Caption underneath

The Modular External Fixation Kit for Simulation Training with 3D Printed Adult Tibial Bone Models contains the following components (left to right)ː

  1. 50 mL Syringe
  2. Scalpel Handle with 22 Blade
  3. Chuck Key
  4. Battery Powered Drill compatible with 3.5 mm Schanz Screws (Arbutus Medical HEX Drill is shown in image without DrillCover Hex Linen)
  5. Self-Drilling Schanz Screws, 3.5 mm diameter
  6. 3.2 mm and 4.5 mm Combination Drill Sleeve
  7. Universal Chuck with T-Handle for 3.5 mm Schanz Screws
  8. Pin-to-Rod Clamps for 6.5 mm rods and 3.5 mm Schanz Screws
  9. Rods, 6.5 mm diameter, for Clamps designed for 3.5 mm Schanz Screws
  10. Rod-to-Rod Clamps for 6.5 mm rods
  11. Connecting Rod, 8.0 mm diameter
  12. Spanner with T Handle Wrench, 8 mm, and
  13. Protractor.

Learning Objectives[edit | edit source]

Our user testing in Nigeria showed that the 3D printed bone simulation models would tolerate near cortex drilling and manual advancement with a 3.5 mm self-drilling Schanz screws without the need for pre-drilled bicortical holes. It is acceptable to use smaller sized hardware for simulation skills training because the fundamental principles for modular external fixation are the same irrespective of hardware size. In the future, we will be conducting additional testing to identify alternative 3D printed materials to permit learners to use the same sized hardware for simulation training and operating room procedures.

The goal of this module page is to educate the learner on the differences between the simulation training hardware for 3D Printed Adult Tibial Bone Models and the orthopedic surgical hardware used in the operating room.

Modular External Fixation Kit for Simulation Training with 3D Printed Adult Tibial Bone Models
# Item Quantity Function Key Differences Between this Module's Simulation Training Hardware and Surgical Hardware Used in the Operating Room on Patients with Open Tibial Shaft Fractures
1 50 mL Syringe 1 Used to irrigate and debride an open fracture to reduce contamination Normally 1 to 2 L of sterile Normal Saline is used for wound lavage during the actual procedure for an open tibial fracture but in this simulation skills training module, an empty syringe can be used instead of a syringe filled with normal saline.
2 Scalpel Handle with 22 Blade 1 Used to make the stab incision in the soft tissue for Schanz Screw insertion
3 Chuck Key 1 Allows insertion of the self-drilling Schanz Screw into the powered drill
4 Battery Powered Drill 1 Drives Schanz Screw into fracture fragment, also referred to as "power drive"
5 Self-Drilling Schanz Screws, 3.5 mm diameter 4 Inserted into fracture fragments, also referred to as "pins" The standard diameter of a Schanz Screw for tibial fractures is 4.5 mm. However, a 3.5 diameter Schanz Screw is used in this simulation skills training module to reduce the risk of mechanical failure of the 3D printed plastic bone models when the Schanz Screw is manually advanced into the far cortex.
6 3.2 mm and 4.5 mm Combination Drill Sleeve 1 Protects the soft tissue when drilling Schanz Screws Normally the 4.5 mm Drill Sleeve end is used in actual procedures for tibial fractures. Normally the Drill Sleeve is positioned directly on top of the bone but in this simulation skills training module, the 3.2 mm Drill Sleeve should be held 3.0 mm above the bone simulator while drilling in order to prevent the plastic strands from getting stuck inside the Drill Sleeve assembly.
7 Universal Chuck with T-Handle for 3.5 mm Schanz Screws 1 Allows for manual advancement of the Schanz Screw to the desired depth Normally a Universal Chuck with T Handle for 4.5 mm Schanz Screws are used in actual procedures for tibial fractures.
8 Pin-to-Rod Clamps (for 6.5 mm rods and 3.5 mm Schanz Screws) 4 Combines pin-to-rod Normally Pin-to-Rod Clamps for 4.5 mm diameter Schanz Screws and 11 mm Rods are used in actual procedures for tibial fractures.
9 Rods, 6.5 mm diameter (for Clamps designed for 3.5 mm Schanz Screws) 2 Links pins with clamps, available in several sizes Normally Rods 11 mm in diameter compatible with Clamps designed for 4.5 mm diameter Schanz Screws are used in actual procedures for tibial fractures.
10 Rod-to-Rod Clamps (for 6.5 mm Rods) 2 Combines rod-to-rod Normally Clamps for 11 mm diameter Rods are used in actual procedures for tibial fractures.
11 Connecting Rod, 8.0 mm diameter, 10 and 15 cm in length 1 of each Normally 11 mm Rods are used in actual procedures for tibial fractures.
12 Spanner with T Handle Wrench, 8 mm 1 Assists in final tightening of clamps Normally a Spanner with T Handle for 11 mm Rods are used in actual procedures for tibial fractures.
13 Protractor 1 Measures drill trajectory angles of Schanz screws for the Training Logbook A Protractor is not normally required in actual procedures for tibial fractures. This item is used to confirm drill trajectory angles for the Self-Assessment Framework of the Modular External Fixation for an Open Tibial Transverse Shaft Fracture simulation skills training module.