Kelp

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Revision as of 02:31, 6 December 2015 by Felicity Tepper (talk | Contributions) (Adding category and a small tidy up)
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Kelp, also known as bladderwrack.

Kelp is a water plant, so never goes into submission as it generally thrives where the water temperature is high enough to sustain life.

Uses for kelp

Parts used: whole plant. Constituents: mucilage, mannitol, volatile oil, potassium, iodine, and many other minerals

Medicinal

Medical: Colds, fractures, psoriasis, goiter, kidneys, diabetes, general tonic, obesity, heart problems, eczema, glands, builds blood vessels, menopause, hypoglycemia, constipation, dry skin, prostate/adrenal/pituitary/thyroid, colitis, cold hands/feet, slow nail growth, neres, arteries, nausea, morning sickness, brittle hair, skin ailments, anemia, fat hips, arthritis/rheumatism/joints (interior and exterior), fatigue, cancer, pregnancy, bursitis, hot flashes.[verification needed] Many of these are cause by low iodine levels, which kelp is extremely high in. Kelp also helps transmit minerals in the body.[verification needed]

For pain relief and to lower inflammation for arthritis, use an external compress and plaster.

Other uses

In great amount, kelp ash can be use in soap and glass making. It is also used as a thickening agent in food.

How to prepare: You can make an infusion of kelp. Also if you own a mortar and pestle you can grind it up and use it in pill form.