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== ABSTRACT ==
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== Abstract ==
 
<center>''Purpose: to come up with an attractive, sustainable, and space efficient clothes drying system for H.S.U.'s CCAT. With the general goal to help educate and inspire others who seek alternative solutions to everyday waste problems.''</center>
 
<center>''Purpose: to come up with an attractive, sustainable, and space efficient clothes drying system for H.S.U.'s CCAT. With the general goal to help educate and inspire others who seek alternative solutions to everyday waste problems.''</center>
    
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</center>
    
== Background ==
 
== Background ==
Historically clothes drying has taken place on clothes lines that we could view hanging off peoples balconies throughout the city. This occurred through solar radiation and wind convection causing evaporation.
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Historically clothes drying has taken place on clothes lines that we could view hanging off peoples balconies throughout the city.  
   As many energy conservationists may already know, drying clothes in a traditional drier contributes to a large part of the average households energy use. At HSU's CCAT building, three student co directors reside and have clothes drying needs every week. Since CCAT's main focus is to "educate the public about the impacts of our technologies on the environment"<ref>http://www.humboldt.edu/~ccat/about.php</ref> it would seem fitting to design and build a energy free drying system for their washed clothes.
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  This occurred through solar radiation and wind convection causing evaporation.  
   The goal is to build a passive clothes drying system for the CCAT house. Using both a simple yet effective design that could be easily copied by others desiring to ween them selves from yet another energy dependent device. As well as being space efficient and esthetically pleasing so others would want to use one.<ref>Chhimi Dorji, CCAT Project Manager</ref>
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   As many energy conservationists may already know, drying clothes in a traditional drier contributes to a large part of the average households energy use.  
 +
  At HSU's CCAT building, three student co-directors reside and have clothes drying needs every week.
 +
  Since CCAT's main focus is to "educate the public about the impacts of our technologies on the environment" <ref>http://www.humboldt.edu/~ccat/about.php</ref> it would seem fitting to design and build a energy free drying system for their washed clothes.
 +
   The goal is to build a passive clothes drying system for the CCAT house. Using both a simple yet effective design that could be easily copied by others desiring to ween them selves from yet another energy dependent device.  
 +
  As well as being space efficient and esthetically pleasing so others would want to use one. <ref>Chhimi Dorji, CCAT Project Manager</ref>
    
===Why bother?===
 
===Why bother?===
   Conventional driers contribute to a large part of the average persons carbon foot print which has been linked to global warming. This is a easy way to make a big difference plus it's better for your clothes. See  [[http://www.appropedia.org/Clothes_Drying ]]
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   Conventional driers contribute to a large part of the average persons carbon foot print which has been linked to global warming. This is a easy way to make a big difference plus it's better for your clothes. See  [[http://www.appropedia.org/Clothes_Drying Clothes Drying]]
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[[Image:Bamboo_leaves.jpg|thumb|right]]
 
[[Image:Bamboo_leaves.jpg|thumb|right]]
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   The unit should stand about 6' tall 4' wide and 2' deep when extended from the wall and then when not in use collapse against the wall to about 7' tall and about 5" deep or less. The goal is to have more usable space when the device is not needed but still keeping it convenient, sturdy and reliable.
 
   The unit should stand about 6' tall 4' wide and 2' deep when extended from the wall and then when not in use collapse against the wall to about 7' tall and about 5" deep or less. The goal is to have more usable space when the device is not needed but still keeping it convenient, sturdy and reliable.
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[[Image:DryRackSides.jpg|thumb|right|pic.3: Side Components]]
   
[[Image:DryRack_side.jpg|thumb|right|pic.4: single side]]
 
[[Image:DryRack_side.jpg|thumb|right|pic.4: single side]]
 
[[Image:DR_Side.jpg|thumb|left|right|pic.5: Bamboo Poles]]
 
[[Image:DR_Side.jpg|thumb|left|right|pic.5: Bamboo Poles]]
      
*<font color="olive">Note:Prices based off of Ace hardware, and Mad River Gardening in Arcata</font>
 
*<font color="olive">Note:Prices based off of Ace hardware, and Mad River Gardening in Arcata</font>
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== PROCEDURE: ==
 
== PROCEDURE: ==
For a rack that measures 6' tall and 2' deep when extended, with 2" diameter bamboo poles.
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<center>For a rack that measures 6' tall and 2' deep when extended, with 2" diameter bamboo poles.
 
*You'll need to cut:
 
*You'll need to cut:
 
**the bamboo into poles of
 
**the bamboo into poles of
 
6 @ 3'8 , 2 @ 4', 8 @ 3'7"  
 
6 @ 3'8 , 2 @ 4', 8 @ 3'7"  
**the twine into 10 pieces @ 3.5'  
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**the twine into 10 pieces @ 3.5' </center>
 
   
   <center> *Note: Bamboo varies, so measure the diameter of the poles you will join to see how much shorter your short poles should be. ex.) If your poles diameter is 2" minus 4" off the long length to give you 3'8" instead of 4'. </center>
 
   <center> *Note: Bamboo varies, so measure the diameter of the poles you will join to see how much shorter your short poles should be. ex.) If your poles diameter is 2" minus 4" off the long length to give you 3'8" instead of 4'. </center>
 
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