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== '''Build Your Own Vermicomposting Toilet''' ==
 
== '''Build Your Own Vermicomposting Toilet''' ==
We have been intrigued with a unique style of composting toilet which is in use by some members of the natural building community. It combines two tried and tested principles of organic gardening: vermicomposting and moldering (i.e., low temperature) composting toilets. Although I have never used one, I am told that it works well. In order to further this idea we have researched one installation and are attaching simple plans for construction.
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We have been intrigued with a unique style of composting toilet which is in use by some members of the [[natural building]] community. It combines two tried and tested principles of organic gardening: vermicomposting and moldering (i.e., low temperature) composting toilets. Although I have never used one, I am told that it works well. In order to further this idea we have researched one installation and are attaching simple plans for construction.
 
The basic idea is to create a friendly habitat for worms and keep them continuously supplied with food. Their job is to consume and digest compostables (including human bio-wastes) into rich garden compost. In order to facilitate harvest of this compost the system is designed to operate in batches, and consists of two chambers. One chamber is used until it is "full". The worms are then allowed to complete digestion while a second chamber accepts new material. (A similar batch method is typically used for composting.) When the second chamber becomes filled, the first chamber is emptied and the process starts all over. Because urine contains a lot of sodium and urea (an important nutrient for photosynthesis), it is best to separate it for direct application (or diluted with 5 parts water) on plants.   
 
The basic idea is to create a friendly habitat for worms and keep them continuously supplied with food. Their job is to consume and digest compostables (including human bio-wastes) into rich garden compost. In order to facilitate harvest of this compost the system is designed to operate in batches, and consists of two chambers. One chamber is used until it is "full". The worms are then allowed to complete digestion while a second chamber accepts new material. (A similar batch method is typically used for composting.) When the second chamber becomes filled, the first chamber is emptied and the process starts all over. Because urine contains a lot of sodium and urea (an important nutrient for photosynthesis), it is best to separate it for direct application (or diluted with 5 parts water) on plants.   
 
[[image:Vermicomposting_Toilet_1.JPG|right|frame|]]
 
[[image:Vermicomposting_Toilet_1.JPG|right|frame|]]

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