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Reduced concentration oral rehydration solution

180 bytes added, 04:38, 12 May 2008
arrange, same small edits
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'''Reduced concentation concentration oral rehydration solution''' (or '''reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution''') is less concentrated than traditionally used in [[oral rehydration therapy]]. Some tests have found it to result in "reduced need for unscheduled intravenous infusions, lower stool volume, and less vomiting compared with standard WHO rehydration solution."<ref>
[http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/323/7304/81 Reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution for treating dehydration due to diarrhoea in children: systematic review] -- Hahn et al. In contrast, <ref>[http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10440307 Efficacy and safety of oral rehydration solution with reduced osmolarity in adults with cholera: a randomised double-blind clinical trial] (CHOICE study group, [[ICDDRB]]) failed to find a difference in cholera patients.</ref>
However, concerns have been raised that this is unsuitable for universal use, as it may lead to a negative sodium balance in cholera patients, with very serious consequences.<ref> [http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/291/21/2632?etoc JAMA -- Clinical Concerns About Reduced-Osmolarity Oral Rehydration Solution]; [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10440307 Efficacy and safety of oral rehydration solution with reduced osmolarity in adults with cholera: a randomised double-blind clinical trial]. CHOICE study group, [[ICDDRB]].</ref> For this reason [[starch-based oral rehydration solutions]] may be preferred methods of achieving the same effects with less risk, especially in serious cases.
== Composition and usage ==
 
:''See also [[Oral rehydration solution recipes]] for the conventional version.''
 
The 2004 [[WHO]] recipe for home-made Oral Rehydration Salts:
== Questions and comments ==
* Perhaps this is suitable when the patient is able to take some other food, and is not relying solely on the ORS? --[[User:Chriswaterguy|Chriswaterguy]] 19:20, 11 May 2008 (PDT)
* In the medical literature available through a Google search, this is referred to as '''reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution'''. To make it more understandable to the lay person, I've changed it to '''reduced concentation oral rehydration solution''', which doesn't have any hits online. Is there a better term to use? (Or... is it only the salt that's reduced, in which case it should be '''reduced salinity oral rehydration solution'''...)
==External links ==
* [http://www.supply.unicef.dk/catalogue/bulletin9.htm New formulation of Oral Rehydration Salts (ORS) with reduced osmolarity] - Technical Bulletin from UNICEF, describing the user of a weaker solution, with the aim of reducing stool output.
 
== Questions and comments ==
 
In the medical literature available through a Google search, this is referred to as '''reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution'''. To make it more understandable to the lay person, I've changed it to '''reduced concentation oral rehydration solution''', which doesn't have any hits online. Is there a better term to use?
==Notes==
<small><references/></small>
 
==External links ==
* [http://www.supply.unicef.dk/catalogue/bulletin9.htm New formulation of Oral Rehydration Salts (ORS) with reduced osmolarity] - Technical Bulletin from UNICEF, describing the user of a weaker solution, with the aim of reducing stool output.
[[Category:Medical care ]]

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