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Fortunately, there are many more examples of how to apply Circular Economy processes even in traditional companies and institutions.
 
Fortunately, there are many more examples of how to apply Circular Economy processes even in traditional companies and institutions.
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The electronics giant Philips based in the Netherlands is experimenting with a "Pay per lux" model. Under this model, the company maintains ownership of the materials, while customers benefit from maintenance and service, as well as from the option to adapt or upgrade their electronics, with the manufacturer able to recover the materials when necessary. Dell has made the first computer using certified closed-loop recycled plastics and uses its international position to influence standards and policies toward a circular economy. And Levi's has started accepting old clothes in its stores and turning them into building materials. It also plans to recycle old Levi's jeans into new ones in the near future.
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The electronics giant Philips based in the [[Netherlands]] is experimenting with a "Pay per lux" model. Under this model, the company maintains ownership of the materials, while customers benefit from maintenance and service, as well as from the option to adapt or upgrade their electronics, with the manufacturer able to recover the materials when necessary. Dell has made the first computer using certified closed-loop recycled plastics and uses its international position to influence standards and policies toward a circular economy. And Levi's has started accepting old clothes in its stores and turning them into building materials. It also plans to recycle old Levi's jeans into new ones in the near future.
    
Meanwhile, in Denmark, where the public sector procures goods and services for around 38 billion euros annually, a national initiative is aiming to shift the country's public procurement practices to support a Circular Economy by prioritizing criteria such as the use of non-toxic chemicals, extended product lifespan, and the cycling of biological and technical materials.
 
Meanwhile, in Denmark, where the public sector procures goods and services for around 38 billion euros annually, a national initiative is aiming to shift the country's public procurement practices to support a Circular Economy by prioritizing criteria such as the use of non-toxic chemicals, extended product lifespan, and the cycling of biological and technical materials.

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