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The primary classification of algae is based upon cellular, not organismal properties: the chemical nature of the wall, if present; the organic reserve materials produced by the Cell; the nature of the photosynthetic pigments; and the nature and arrangement of the flagella borne by motile Cells. In terms of these characters, the algae are arranged in a series of divisions, summarized in Table 26.1.
 
The primary classification of algae is based upon cellular, not organismal properties: the chemical nature of the wall, if present; the organic reserve materials produced by the Cell; the nature of the photosynthetic pigments; and the nature and arrangement of the flagella borne by motile Cells. In terms of these characters, the algae are arranged in a series of divisions, summarized in Table 26.1.
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== Table 26.1 ==
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== The Major Groups of Algae ==
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'''The Group Names''' are: Green algae: division Chlorophyta; Euglenids: division Euglenophyta; Dinoflagellates and related forms: division Pyrrophyta; Chrysophytes and diatoms: division Chrysophyta; Brown algae: division Phaeophyta; and Red algae: division Rhodophyta.
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Major Groups of Algae:  These are characterized by i) the Pigment System (chlorophylls or other special pigments), ii) the composition of the Cell wall, or iii) the nature of reserve materials; and they have the following Group Names - Green algae: division Chlorophyta - Euglenids: division Euglenophyta - Dinoflagellates and related forms: division Pyrrophyta - Chrysophytes and diatoms: division Chrysophyta - Brown algae: division Phaeophyta - and Red algae: division Rhodophyta.
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These are characterized by i) the Pigment System (chlorophylls or other special pigments), ii) the composition of the Cell wall, or iii) the nature of reserve materials;
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Many fossil diatoms are known, because the siliceous skeleton of the wall (Figure 26.6) is practically indestructible, and as diatoms are one of the major groups of algae in the Oceans, large fossil deposits of diatom walls have accumulated in many areas. These deposits, known as ''diatomaceous Earth'', have industrial uses as abrasives and filtering agents.
 
Many fossil diatoms are known, because the siliceous skeleton of the wall (Figure 26.6) is practically indestructible, and as diatoms are one of the major groups of algae in the Oceans, large fossil deposits of diatom walls have accumulated in many areas. These deposits, known as ''diatomaceous Earth'', have industrial uses as abrasives and filtering agents.
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== The Major Groups of Algae ==
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== The Major Groups of Algae temp==
 
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'''The Group Names''' are - Green algae: division Chlorophyta; Euglenids: division Euglenophyta; Dinoflagellates and related forms: division Pyrrophyta; Chrysophytes and diatoms: division Chrysophyta; Brown algae: division Phaeophyta; and Red algae: division Rhodophyta.
      
The main distinctions are based upon the inclusion or not of three types of chlorophylls, special carotenoids and phycobilins; composition of the cellulosic Cell wall (nay, yay and double - and with or without algin); and the Nature of reserve materials (be they starch, paramylum and fats, starch and oils, leucosin and oils, or laminarin and fats); the number and types of Flagella - be there generally two identical flagella per Cell, one two or three flagella per Cell, two flagella dissimilar in form and position on Cell, two flagella arrangement variable, two flagella of unequal length, or none;  and Range of Structure - includes Unicellular, coenocytic, filamentous, and Plantlike Multicellular Forms.
 
The main distinctions are based upon the inclusion or not of three types of chlorophylls, special carotenoids and phycobilins; composition of the cellulosic Cell wall (nay, yay and double - and with or without algin); and the Nature of reserve materials (be they starch, paramylum and fats, starch and oils, leucosin and oils, or laminarin and fats); the number and types of Flagella - be there generally two identical flagella per Cell, one two or three flagella per Cell, two flagella dissimilar in form and position on Cell, two flagella arrangement variable, two flagella of unequal length, or none;  and Range of Structure - includes Unicellular, coenocytic, filamentous, and Plantlike Multicellular Forms.
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