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moved info from biomass article
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*If too much material is placed in the burner, not all of the hydrocarbons will be consumed, so consider limiting the amount of space for the flamable material.  Also consider what type of material is burned locally when designing this burning area
 
*If too much material is placed in the burner, not all of the hydrocarbons will be consumed, so consider limiting the amount of space for the flamable material.  Also consider what type of material is burned locally when designing this burning area
 
*In desnsely populated areas such as refugee camps, multipul households will want to share the stoves, so consider including insulated handles.
 
*In desnsely populated areas such as refugee camps, multipul households will want to share the stoves, so consider including insulated handles.
*As always with appropriate technology, the stoves should be locally constructed with local materials, using local techniques.  This way, you can seed entrepreneurs to produce, sell and repair the stoves after you leave.
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*As always with appropriate technology, the stoves should be locally constructed with local materials, using local techniques.  This way, you can seed entrepreneurs to produce, sell and repair the stoves after you leave.
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*an enclosed fire to retain the heat
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*careful design of pot holder to maximise the heat transfer from fire to pot
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*baffles to create turbulence and hence improve heat transfer
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*dampers to control and optimise the air flow
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*a ceramic insert to minimise the rate of heat loss 
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*a grate to allow for a variety of fuel to be used and ash to be removed
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*metal casing to give strength and durability
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*multi pot systems to maximise heat use and allow several pots to be heated simultaneously
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Much of the research and development work carried out on biomass technologies for rural areas of developing countries has been based on the improvement of traditional stoves. This was initially in response to the threat of deforestation but has also been focused on the needs of women to reduce fuel collection times and improve the kitchen environment by smoke removal. There have been many approaches to stove improvement, some carried out locally and others as part of  wider programmes run by international organisations. Figure 2 below shows a variety of successful improved stove types, some small, portable stoves and others designed for permanent fixture in a household.
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Improving a stove design is a complex procedure which needs a broad understanding of many issues.  Involvement of users in the design process is essential to gain a thorough understanding of the user’s needs and requirements for the stove.  The stove is not merely an appliance for heating food (as it has become in Western society), but is often acts as a social focus, a means of lighting and space heating.  Tar from the fire can help to protect a thatched roof, and the smoke can keep out insects and other pests.  Cooking habits need to be considered, as well as the lifestyle of the users.  Light charcoal stoves used for cooking meat and vegetables are of little use to people who have staple diets such as Ugali, which require large pots and vigorous stirring.  Fuel type can differ greatly; in some countries cow dung is used as a common fuel source, particularly where wood is scarce.  Cost is also a major factor among low-income groups.  Failing to identify these key socio-economic issues will ensure that a stove programme will fail.  The function of an improved stove is not merely to save fuel.
    
==Improved cook stove materials==
 
==Improved cook stove materials==
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