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CCAT Clay-straw slip wall

40 bytes removed, 21:27, 11 May 2010
<gallery>
Image:Greencs2.JPG| cutting test frame
Image:Greencs6.JPG| Screwing screwing together frames
Image: 000 0012.JPG | cutting scrap plywood
Image:100_0881.JPG| finished test frames
</gallery>
''Planar Shavings and Clay:'' <br />
We found this mixture to be ineffective at keeping its shape. It never dried properly and came apart easily when disturbed.<br />
 
<gallery>
Image:Woodchip_mix_test.JPG|mixing shavings and slurry together
Image:Woodchip_mix.JPG|planar shavings coated in clay
Image:planarshavingsclay.JPG|
</gallery>
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''Planar Shavings, Straw and Clay:''<br />
We found the mixture of all three to be more structurally sound, however it also dried very slowly. <br />
 
<gallery>
Image:Finished_woodchip.JPG|finshed woodchip/straw/clay test mix
</gallery>
<br />
''Straw and Clay:''<br />
The most stable of all of our test walls turned out to be our simple straw clay mixture. It dried the quickest and held its shape under several different stress tests. <br />
<br />
Based on these findings we decided to go ahead with the straw-clay slip.<br />
 
Here are some of our pictures documenting the testing and slurry-making process:<br />
 
<gallery>
Image:Woodchip_mix_test.JPG|mixing shavings and slurry together
Image:Woodchip_mix.JPG|planar shavings coated in clay
Image:Finished_woodchip.JPG|finshed woodchip/straw/clay test mix
Image:Test_wall.jpg|mixing straw test wall
Image:Sprouting.JPG|sprouting in straw wall
Image:Sprouting2.JPG|sprouting and some mold growth in straw wall
Image:Greencs7.JPG|Finished test frameImage:100_0881.JPG| Materials: trash can, 5 gallon buckets, tarp, with straw and clay, straw
</gallery>
<br />
Based on these findings we decided to go ahead with the straw-clay slip.<br />
==Infrastructure==
The plastering on our wall has yet to be completed. This plaster will act as a sacrificial layer to the elements.The sun, wind and rain will slowly eat away at the lime plaster.We have yet to see the rate at which the plaster will degrade. We are estimating the plaster will need to reapplied approximately every two years.
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