The precautionary principle is a decision-making principle which states that if an action or policy might cause severe or irreversible harm to the public, in the absence of a scientific consensus that harm would not ensue, the burden of proof falls on those who would advocate taking the action.


The Precautionary Principle is made up of 4 parts:

  1. People have a duty to take anticipatory action to prevent harm.
  2. The burden of proof of harmlessness of a new technology, process, activity, or chemical lies with the proponents, not with the general public.
  3. Before using a new technology, process, or chemical, or starting a new activity, people have an obligation to examine “a full range of alternatives” including the alternative of doing nothing.
  4. Decisions applying the precautionary principle must be “open, informed, and democratic” and “must include affected parties.”

Interwiki links[edit | edit source]

Page data
Published 2007
License CC-BY-SA-4.0
Impact Number of views to this page and its redirects. Updated once a month. Views by admins and bots are not counted. Multiple views during the same session are counted as one. 259
Issues Automatically detected page issues. Click on them to find out more. They may take some minutes to disappear after you fix them. No main image
Cookies help us deliver our services. By using our services, you agree to our use of cookies.