Medical knowledge page data
Required time 30 minutes
Subskill of Self Assessment - CrashSavers

Packing and Bleeding Control . If holding pressure does not stop or sufficiently slow the bleeding, there are other options and techniques to try. The packing helps to provide direct pressure to deep wounds when you may not be able to apply adequate pressure with just your hands.

  •  If the wound is large and/or deep, you can pack the cavity with clean cloths or gauze to help stop the bleeding.
  • When introducing packing material into the wound, it is important that the packing is clean and that you pack the wound as tightly as you can. 
  • Start introducing gauze or clean cloths into the wound and put as many into the wound as can fit. 
  • Then, once you believe no more material can fit into the wound, try and add some more. 
  • This firm packing helps significantly in helping stop the bleeding. 
  • Keep count of how many individual pieces of packing you have introduced into the wound.
  • Once all the packing has been introduced, you should apply more pressure on top of the packing with your hands.  

Steps to Control Hemorrhage[edit | edit source]

Pressure / Packing

Annotations:
  • 00:00 Start
  • 00:19 Types of temporary hemorrhage control
  • 00:58 Steps for temporary hemorrhage control
  • 01:24 How to apply pressure
  • 01:30 How to use packing
  • 01:40 When to use a tourniquet
  • 01:52 When to use a foley
Page data
Part of Crash Savers Trauma
Type Medical knowledge page
Keywords trauma, surgery
SDG Sustainable Development Goals SDG3 Good health and well-being
Authors CrashSavers
Published 2021
License CC-BY-SA-4.0
Affiliations Global Surgical Training Challenge
Impact Number of views to this page. Updated once a month. Views by admins and bots are not counted. Multiple views during the same session are counted as one. 37
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