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Keywords Library of things, Repair cafe
Authors Phil Green
Published 2021
License CC-BY-SA-4.0
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This article focuses on information specific to California community action. Please see our Resources USA page for a national overview, CASwiki resources page for a global overview.

Networks and sustainability initiatives[edit | edit source]

Community resources[edit | edit source]

Citizens data initiative[edit | edit source]

The Wellbeing Project, information from the City of Santa Monica's Office of Wellbeing.

Commons[edit | edit source]

Embassy Network Coliving, Silicon Valley

In 2006, Jessy Kate Schingler and four young engineers landed jobs at NASA in Silicon Valley. Instead of opting for cheaper housing with a long commute in one of the most expensive housing markets in the U.S., they rented a large house nearby and started the first coliving community, Rainbow Mansion. They discovered there was a glut of mansions in the area. They saw a way to create a better quality of life at a lower cost by sharing a mansion, but what was most important to them was growing as people. So, they created an environment to accelerate their personal and professional development through collaboration. In addition to sharing rent, utilities, cars, and food, they began supporting each others' professional projects including startups. They also sought out other people who were interested in changing the world for the better. They hosted workshops and events to learn and network beyond the four walls of their home. They often kept one or two rooms open so young innovators from other countries could visit.

Following Rainbow Mansion's example, many early coliving communities became hubs of learning, innovation, and social activity. Thus the pattern for coliving was set. Now there are hundreds of coliving communities worldwide.

Jessy took this one step further by creating Embassy, a network of coliving houses that give tenants access to many communities. She describes this lifestyle as, "one rent, many locations." Others have followed her lead, and the coliving movement grows as young workers have a great need for affordable housing, meaningful friendships, and professional development. My friend Chelsea Rustrum says of the coliving experience:

"You develop deeper, more real relationships and have the potential to actually work together, actually help each other. Not just in professional ways but in personal ways also." [1]

Video for community action[edit | edit source]

Other resources[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]


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